Culture of chaos: Indigenous women and vulnerability in an Australian rural reserve

Hammill, Janet M. (2000). Culture of chaos: Indigenous women and vulnerability in an Australian rural reserve PhD Thesis, The Australian Centre for Intemational and Tropical Health and Nutrition, The University of Queensland.

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Author Hammill, Janet M.
Thesis Title Culture of chaos: Indigenous women and vulnerability in an Australian rural reserve
School, Centre or Institute The Australian Centre for Intemational and Tropical Health and Nutrition
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2000
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Total pages 236
Language eng
Subjects 200201 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Studies
Formatted abstract Biographical and ethnographic approaches are used in this thesis to describe the endemic nature of violence experienced by Indigenous women in a Deed of Grant in Trust community. The work, influenced by Paolo Friere's participatory action research model, emphasises that people have a right to participate in the production of knowledge that directly affects their lives. Consequently, the thesis evolved as a reciprocal arrangement with women who operate a safety house and advocacy service for women and children as they struggle for justice and social change.

In exchange for assistance with a broad range of community development initiatives including staging events, producing submissions and general correspondence, staff development programs, reports and whatever else needed to be written, the researcher was given a vivid description of the community, its problems and its strengths.

The work documents the political, social and economic activities that a small group of Cherbourg women utilise to bring about change and assert their right to live without violence. It describes their membership of an oppressed group, as sole parents largely dependent on the maternal economy and the matriarchs. It narrates the stories of women experiencing violence in various situations especially that induced by alcohol and in the competition for men. It also demonstrates how the absence of male role models creates negative developmental pathways for children and leads sons into early contact with the criminal justice system.
Keyword Women, Aboriginal Australian -- Crimes against -- Queensland.
Women, Aboriginal Australian -- Queensland -- Social conditions.
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