Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods

Chiou, Tsyr-Huei, Caldwell, Roy L., Hanlon, Roger T. and Cronin, Thomas W. (2008). Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods. In: Proceedings of SPIE: Polarization: Measurement, Analysis, and Remote Sensing VIII. Polarization: Measurement, Analysis, and Remote Sensing VIII, Orlando, United States, (697203.1-697203.10). 18 March 2008. doi:10.1117/12.780061

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Author Chiou, Tsyr-Huei
Caldwell, Roy L.
Hanlon, Roger T.
Cronin, Thomas W.
Title of paper Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods
Conference name Polarization: Measurement, Analysis, and Remote Sensing VIII
Conference location Orlando, United States
Conference dates 18 March 2008
Proceedings title Proceedings of SPIE: Polarization: Measurement, Analysis, and Remote Sensing VIII   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Polarization: Measurement, Analysis, and Remote Sensing VIII   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Bellingham, United States
Publisher SPIE; The International Society for Optical Engineering
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1117/12.780061
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
ISBN 9780819471635
ISSN 0277-786X
Volume 6972
Start page 697203.1
End page 697203.10
Total pages 10
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The lighting of the underwater environment is constantly changing due to attenuation by water, scattering by suspended particles, as well as the refraction and reflection caused by the surface waves. These factors pose a great challenge for marine animals which communicate through visual signals, especially those based on color. To escape this problem, certain cephalopod mollusks and stomatopod crustaceans utilize the polarization properties of light. While the mechanisms behind the polarization vision of these two animal groups are similar, several distinctive types of polarizers (i.e. the structure producing the signal) have been found in these animals. To gain a better knowledge of how these polarizers function, we studied the relationships between fine structures and optical properties of four types of polarizers found in cephalopods and stomatopods. Although all the polarizers share a somewhat similar spectral range, around 450- 550 nm, the reflectance properties of the signals and the mechanisms used to produce them have dramatic differences. In cephalopods, stack-plates polarizers produce the polarization patterns found on the arms and around their eyes. In stomatopods, we have found one type of beam-splitting polarizer based on photonic structures and two absorptive polarizer types based on dichroic molecules. These stomatopod polarizers may be found on various appendages, and on the cuticle covering dorsal or lateral sides of the animal. Since the efficiencies of all these polarizer types are somewhat sensitive to the change of illumination and viewing angle, how these animals compensate with different behaviors or fine structural features of the polarizer also varies.
Subjects 060808 Invertebrate Biology
Keyword Biological polarisers
Crustaceans
Cephalopods
Stomatopods
Vision
Light
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Copyright 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.

 
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Created: Tue, 08 Dec 2009, 12:07:22 EST by Michael Affleck on behalf of Faculty of Science