Active-input provides more movement and muscle activity during electronic game playing by children

Straker, L., Pollock, C., Piek, J., Abbott, R., Skoss, R. and Coleman, J. (2009) Active-input provides more movement and muscle activity during electronic game playing by children. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 25 8: 713-728. doi:10.1080/10447310903025495


Author Straker, L.
Pollock, C.
Piek, J.
Abbott, R.
Skoss, R.
Coleman, J.
Title Active-input provides more movement and muscle activity during electronic game playing by children
Journal name International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1044-7318
Publication date 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10447310903025495
Volume 25
Issue 8
Start page 713
End page 728
Total pages 16
Editor G. Salvendy
J.A. Jacko
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
080602 Computer-Human Interaction
920501 Child Health
Abstract The majority of children in affluent countries now play electronic games, and this has lead to concerns about the health impact of this activity. Traditional electronic games have used gamepad, keyboard, and mouse input, but newer game interfaces that require more movement are now available. However the movement and muscle activity demands of electronic games have not been described. This study compared the amount of movement and muscle activity while 20 children aged 9 to 12 years watched a DVD and played games using handheld computer, gamepad, keyboard, steering wheel and, active-input (Webcam motion analysis-Sony EyeToy®) devices. Movement of the head, sacrum, foot, shoulder, wrist, and thumb was measured along with activity in cervical erector spinae, lumbar erector spinae, rectus femoris, upper trapezius, anterior deltoid, and wrist extensor muscles. Use of the wheel resulted in some increase in upper limb movement and muscle activity, but the other traditional input devices were usually as sedentary as watching a DVD. In contrast, use of the active-input device (EyeToy) resulted in substantial movement and muscle activity in limbs and torso. These results suggest that playing traditional electronic games is indeed a sedentary activity but that new active-input technologies may be useful in encouraging more movement and muscle activity in children.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 07 Dec 2009, 18:01:56 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences