New onset albuminuria, hypertension and diabetes in a high risk aboriginal community over 10 years

Hoy, WE, Sharma, SK, Bloomfield, H, Swanson, CE, Mott, S and Scott, JA (2009). New onset albuminuria, hypertension and diabetes in a high risk aboriginal community over 10 years. In: Nephrology. Abstracts of the 45th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology. 45th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, (A9-A9). 7–9 September 2009. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01176.x


Author Hoy, WE
Sharma, SK
Bloomfield, H
Swanson, CE
Mott, S
Scott, JA
Title of paper New onset albuminuria, hypertension and diabetes in a high risk aboriginal community over 10 years
Conference name 45th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology
Conference location Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Conference dates 7–9 September 2009
Proceedings title Nephrology. Abstracts of the 45th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
Publication Year 2009
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01176.x
ISSN 1320-5358
1440-1797
Volume 14
Issue s1
Start page A9
End page A9
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Background: Most studies of chronic disease in Aboriginal people have described prevalence on cross-sectional surveys. We estimated incidence rates through a longitudinal study, (mean 10.4 years follow up), in one high risk Northern Territory Aboriginal community. Methods: Community-wide surveys, each with >80% participation, were conducted from 1992–1996 and 2004–2006, and defined rates of albuminuria (ACR > 3.4 g/mol), hypertension (BP > 140/90) and diabetes (history, medicines or defining glycemia). Results: In the first survey of 962 adults (18+ years, median 32.6 years), 45.7% had albuminuria, 23.5% had hypertension and 13.5% had diabetes, while 39.3% had none of these conditions. In the second survey (n = 1153 adults, median age 34.2 years) these rates were 44.8%, 17.4% and 19.5%. Among 250 adults with no abnormality on the first screen who participated in the second screen, 54.7% had developed one or more problems: 45.1% had developed albuminuria, 16.2% had developed hypertension and 15.6% had developed diabetes. These minimum incidence rates of 4.3, 1.6 and 1.5 per person year translate to rates of 8.6, 3.2 and 3.2 per person year if the conditions appeared halfway through the follow-up period. The proportion of previously unaffected people who had developed any one of these conditions by the second screen was 54.7%, with an estimated incidence of 11% per year if those conditions appeared mid-way through the follow-up period. Discussion: Incidence rates of new disease are striking in this youthful Aboriginal population. Recent improvements in mortality and renal failure are clearly due to better surveillance and treatment, rather than fundamental diminution of risk. This information shows that those efforts cannot be relaxed. Specific targets for primary prevention remain obscure while the nature of accentuated susceptibility is not understood.
Subjects 1103 Clinical Sciences
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Article number: 034

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 06 Dec 2009, 00:02:14 EST