Integral projection models perform better for small demographic data sets than matrix population models: a case study of two perennial herbs

Ramula, Satu, Rees, Mark and Buckley, Yvonne M. (2009) Integral projection models perform better for small demographic data sets than matrix population models: a case study of two perennial herbs. Journal of Applied Ecology, 46 5: 1048-1053. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2664.2009.01706.x


Author Ramula, Satu
Rees, Mark
Buckley, Yvonne M.
Title Integral projection models perform better for small demographic data sets than matrix population models: a case study of two perennial herbs
Journal name Journal of Applied Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-8901
Publication date 2009-10
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2009.01706.x
Volume 46
Issue 5
Start page 1048
End page 1053
Total pages 6
Editor G. Kerby
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
060207 Population Ecology
960603 Environmental Lifecycle Assessment
Formatted abstract
1.
Matrix population models are widely used to describe population dynamics, conduct population viability analyses and derive management recommendations for plant populations. For endangered or invasive species, management decisions are often based on small demographic data sets. Hence, there is a need for population models which accurately assess population performance from such small data sets.

2.
We used demographic data on two perennial herbs with different life histories to compare the accuracy and precision of the traditional matrix population model and the recently developed integral projection model (IPM) in relation to the amount of data.

3.
For large data sets both matrix models and IPMs produced identical estimates of population growth rate (λ). However, for small data sets containing fewer than 300 individuals, IPMs often produced smaller bias and variance for λ than matrix models despite different matrix structures and sampling techniques used to construct the matrix population models.

4.

Synthesis and applications. Our results suggest that the smaller bias and variance of λ estimates make IPMs preferable to matrix population models for small demographic data sets with a few hundred individuals. These results are likely to be applicable to a wide range of herbaceous, perennial plant species where demographic fate can be modelled as a function of a continuous state variable such as size. We recommend the use of IPMs to assess population performance and management strategies particularly for endangered or invasive perennial herbs where little demographic data are available.
Keyword Demography
Integral projection model
Management
Matrix population model
Plant population dynamics
Population growth rate
Population viability analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Tue, 01 Dec 2009, 11:03:31 EST by Hayley Ware on behalf of School of Biological Sciences