Dynamic marine protected areas can improve the resilience of coral reef systems

Game, ET, Bode, M, McDonald-Madden, E, Grantham, HS and Possingham, HP (2009) Dynamic marine protected areas can improve the resilience of coral reef systems. Ecology Letters, 12 12: 1336-1346. doi:10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01384.x


Author Game, ET
Bode, M
McDonald-Madden, E
Grantham, HS
Possingham, HP
Title Dynamic marine protected areas can improve the resilience of coral reef systems
Journal name Ecology Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1461-023X
Publication date 2009-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01384.x
Volume 12
Issue 12
Start page 1336
End page 1346
Total pages 10
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
050205 Environmental Management
960808 Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Abstract Marine Protected Areas are usually static, permanently closed areas. There are, however, both social and ecological reasons to adopt dynamic closures, where reserves move through time. Using a general theoretical framework, we investigate whether dynamic closures can improve the mean biomass of herbivorous fishes on reef systems, thereby enhancing resilience to undesirable phase-shifts. At current levels of reservation (10–30%), moving protection between all reefs in a system is unlikely to improve herbivore biomass, but can lead to a more even distribution of biomass. However, if protected areas are rotated among an appropriate subset of the entire reef system (e.g. rotating 10 protected areas between only 20 reefs in a 100 reef system), dynamic closures always lead to increased mean herbivore biomass. The management strategy that will achieve the highest mean herbivore biomass depends on both the trajectories and rates of population recovery and decline. Given the current large-scale threats to coral reefs, the ability of dynamic marine protected areas to achieve conservation goals deserves more attention.
Keyword Coral reefs
dynamic management
marine reserves
periodic closures
resilience
GREAT-BARRIER-REEF
PAPUA-NEW-GUINEA
ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT
CLIMATE-CHANGE
PHASE-SHIFTS
RESERVES
FISH
CONSERVATION
RECOVERY
COMMUNITIES
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Sun, 29 Nov 2009, 00:04:29 EST