Collaboration between primary care and psychiatric services: does it help family physicians?

Kisely, Stephen, Duerden, Debbie, Shaddick, Susan and Jayabarathan, Ajantha (2006) Collaboration between primary care and psychiatric services: does it help family physicians?. Canadian Family Physician, 52 7: 876-877.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ187933_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 285.50KB 1
Author Kisely, Stephen
Duerden, Debbie
Shaddick, Susan
Jayabarathan, Ajantha
Title Collaboration between primary care and psychiatric services: does it help family physicians?
Journal name Canadian Family Physician   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0008-350X
Publication date 2006-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 52
Issue 7
Start page 876
End page 877
Total pages 2
Place of publication Don Mills, Ont., Canada
Publisher College of Family Physicians of Canada
Language eng
Subject 111717 Primary Health Care
110319 Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy)
Formatted abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare family physicians' reports of their experiences managing patients with psychiatric disorders in settings with and without access to collaborative mental health services.

DESIGN: Survey using a questionnaire adapted from a similar study in Australia. Family physicians were asked about their knowledge, skills, and degree of comfort in managing the following psychiatric disorders derived from the primary care version of the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases: psychosis, depression, anxiety, childhood disorders, and stress-related disorders. We also compared the 2 groups of physicians regarding their satisfaction with mental health services in general.

SETTING: The Capital District Health Authority (CDHA) in Nova Scotia.

PARTICIPANTS: All family physicians practising in the CDHA.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported knowledge, skills, and degree of comfort in managing psychiatric problems; satisfaction with mental health services, adjusted for family physicians' demographics; and stated interest in mental health.

RESULTS: We received 101 responses (37 from physicians with access to collaborative care and 64 from physicians without access) from 7 communities in the CDHA. Family physicians who had access to collaborative care reported significantly greater knowledge in the areas of psychosis, alcohol or substance use, and childhood behavioural problems; and better skills in managing psychosis, alcohol or substance use, childhood depression or anxiety, childhood behavioural disorders, and relationship problems. Their comfort levels in managing relationship problems and childhood behavioural disorders were also significantly higher. Family physicians with access to collaborative care were significantly more satisfied with mental health services, over and above shared care. All these differences remained significant after controlling for sex, level of interest in mental health, and years in practice.

CONCLUSION: Family physicians with access to collaborative care reported greater knowledge, better skills, and more comfort in managing psychiatric disorders and greater satisfaction with mental health services. Further work is needed to establish why this is so and to determine any effect on patient outcomes, such as symptoms, quality of life, and psychosocial functioning.
Keyword family physicians
CDHA
Psychiatric Disorders
Collaborative mental health services
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 25 Nov 2009, 16:33:01 EST by Maria Campbell on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences