Are we applying interventions with research evidence when targeting secondary complications of the stroke-affected upper limb

Gustafsson, Louise and Yates, Kathryn (2009) Are we applying interventions with research evidence when targeting secondary complications of the stroke-affected upper limb. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 56 6: 428-435. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1630.2008.00757.x


Author Gustafsson, Louise
Yates, Kathryn
Title Are we applying interventions with research evidence when targeting secondary complications of the stroke-affected upper limb
Journal name Australian Occupational Therapy Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0045-0766
1440-1630
Publication date 2009-12
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1630.2008.00757.x
Volume 56
Issue 6
Start page 428
End page 435
Total pages 8
Editor Elspeth Froude
Janet Fricke
Place of publication Richmond, Vic., Australia
Publisher Blackwell Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract Background/aim:  This study aimed to survey occupational therapy practice with reference to the current evidence for management of secondary complications of the stroke-affected upper limb.

Methods:  A questionnaire was developed to identify the clinical practice of occupational therapists in managing the client's stroke-affected upper limb. Participants were recruited via an email to the national occupational therapy neurology listserve. Occupational therapists working in stroke rehabilitation were invited to complete the questionnaire online or to print off and return.

Results:  Fifty-five occupational therapists completed the questionnaire. Results revealed that treatment techniques with little to no evidence were used frequently, including pillow cushion supports (98%), positional stretch (94%) and slings (61%). Alternatively, treatment techniques with significant supporting evidence were used at a lower frequency, such as electrical stimulation (39%).

Conclusions:  The results of the questionnaire highlight an inconsistent application of evidence within clinical practice and the consistent application of treatment techniques with poor supporting evidence. This result does not represent poor clinical practice. Rather, it highlights the need for the research literature to articulate the clinical reasoning underpinning clinicians’ selection of treatment techniques and to determine the effectiveness of frequently used, but poorly supported treatment techniques.
© 2008 The Authors
Journal compilation © 2008 Australian Association of Occupational Therapists
Keyword Evidence
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Upper limb
Randomized controlled-trial
Hemiplegic shoulder pain
Electrical-stimulation
Subluxation
Arm
Contracture
Supports
Therapy
Stretch
Motion
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 10 OCT 2008

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 22 Nov 2009, 00:08:39 EST