Why Do Men and Women Challenge Gender Discrimination in the Workplace? The Role of Group Status and In-group Identification in Predicting Pathways to Collective Action

Iyer, Aarti and Ryan, Michelle K. (2009) Why Do Men and Women Challenge Gender Discrimination in the Workplace? The Role of Group Status and In-group Identification in Predicting Pathways to Collective Action. Journal of Social Issues, 65 4: 791-814. doi:10.1111/j.1540-4560.2009.01625.x


Author Iyer, Aarti
Ryan, Michelle K.
Title Why Do Men and Women Challenge Gender Discrimination in the Workplace? The Role of Group Status and In-group Identification in Predicting Pathways to Collective Action
Journal name Journal of Social Issues   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-4537
Publication date 2009-12
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1540-4560.2009.01625.x
Volume 65
Issue 4
Start page 791
End page 814
Total pages 24
Editor Sheri R Levy
Place of publication United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
97 Expanding Knowledge
Abstract Group status and group identification were hypothesized to moderate the predictors of collective action to challenge gender discrimination against women. Higher identifiers were expected to respond to the inequality through the lens of their in-group's interests. Among highly identified women, collective action was predicted by appraisals of illegitimacy and feelings of anger, suggesting that they felt a sense of solidarity with the victims and experienced the justice violation as personally relevant. In contrast, higher identification with the high-status group should reflect more investment in the advantaged in-group, relative to the interests of the victimized out-group members. Thus, among highly identified men, collective action intentions were predicted by perceiving the inequality as pervasive (i.e., not limited to a few cases) and feelings of sympathy for victims. This suggests that highly identified men did not experience the inequality as self-relevant until they saw it as too widespread to be ignored. In contrast, men and women with lower gender group identification demonstrated more similar pathways to collective action, where sympathy was the main predictor. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
Keyword PRECARIOUS LEADERSHIP POSITIONS
GLASS CLIFF
INTERGROUP BEHAVIOR
EMOTIONAL-REACTIONS
GROUP MEMBERSHIP
SOCIAL IDENTITY
GUILT
PARTICIPATION
DISTINCTION
MOVEMENT
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Additional Notes First published online 2nd November, 2009. Published in print December, 2009.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 30 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 22 Nov 2009, 00:03:00 EST