Children have less variable postures and muscle activities when using new electronic information technology compared with old paper-based information technology

Straker, L., Maslen, B., Burgess-Limerick, R. and Pollock, C. (2009) Children have less variable postures and muscle activities when using new electronic information technology compared with old paper-based information technology. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 19 2: e132-e143. doi:10.1016/j.jelekin.2007.11.011


Author Straker, L.
Maslen, B.
Burgess-Limerick, R.
Pollock, C.
Title Children have less variable postures and muscle activities when using new electronic information technology compared with old paper-based information technology
Journal name Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1050-6411
1873-5711
Publication date 2009-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jelekin.2007.11.011
Volume 19
Issue 2
Start page e132
End page e143
Total pages 12
Editor M. Solomonow
Place of publication Kidlington, OX
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
920409 Injury Control
920501 Child Health
111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Abstract Children now have considerable exposure to new information technologies (IT) such as desktop computers. A reported association between computer use and discomfort in children has prompted concerns about the musculoskeletal stresses associated with computer use. There were no detailed data on children reading and writing, nor any evidence on the variability of postures and muscle activity whilst children use IT. Twenty-four children (10–12 years old; 12 male) performed a reading and writing task using new IT (computer/keyboard/mouse with high display and mid height display) and old IT (book/paper/pen). Spinal and upper limb 3D posture and muscle activity were recorded and estimates of mean and variation calculated. The mean postures for children reading and writing with computers were more neutral than when they read and wrote with old IT. Similarly, mean muscle activity levels were lower during computer use than old IT use. However, new IT use also resulted in less variable, more monotonous postures and muscle activities. Moderate differences in computer display height had little effect on posture and muscle activity variation. Variation in musculoskeletal stresses is considered an important component of the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. Children should therefore be encouraged to ensure task variety when using new IT to offset the greater posture and muscle activity monotony.
Keyword Computer
Musculoskeletal disorder
Variation
Posture
Muscle activity
Children
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 21 Nov 2009, 22:01:40 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences