A group intervention which assists patients with dual diagnosis reduce their drug use: a randomized controlled trial

James, W., Preston, N. J., Koh, G., Spencer, C., Kisely, S. R. and Castle, D. J. (2004) A group intervention which assists patients with dual diagnosis reduce their drug use: a randomized controlled trial. Psychological Medicine, 34 6: 983-990. doi:10.1017/S0033291703001648


Author James, W.
Preston, N. J.
Koh, G.
Spencer, C.
Kisely, S. R.
Castle, D. J.
Title A group intervention which assists patients with dual diagnosis reduce their drug use: a randomized controlled trial
Journal name Psychological Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-8978
0033-2917
Publication date 2004-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0033291703001648
Volume 34
Issue 6
Start page 983
End page 990
Total pages 8
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject 110319 Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy)
Abstract Background. There is a well-recognized association between substance use and psychotic disorders, sometimes described as ‘dual diagnosis’. The use of substances by people with psychosis has a negative impact in terms of symptoms, longitudinal course of illness and psychosocial adjustment. There are few validated treatments for such individuals, and those that do exist are usually impracticable in routine clinical settings. The present study employs a randomized controlled experimental design to examine the effectiveness of a manualized group-based intervention in helping patients with dual diagnosis reduce their substance use. Method. The active intervention consisted of weekly 90-min sessions over 6 weeks. The manualized intervention was tailored to participants' stage of change and motivations for drug use. The control condition was a single educational session. Results. Sixty-three subjects participated, of whom 58 (92%) completed a 3-month follow-up assessment of psychopathology, medication and substance use. Significant reductions in favour of the treatment condition were observed for psychopathology, chlorpromazine equivalent dose of antipsychotics, alcohol and illicit substance use, severity of dependence and hospitalization. Conclusions. It is possible to reduce substance use in individuals with psychotic disorders, using a targeted group-based approach. This has important implications for clinicians who wish to improve the long-term outcome of their patients.
Keyword Abuse screening-test
Substance Use
schizophrenia
Disorders
illness
Reasons
comorbidity
patterns
scale
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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