The biology of extinct and extant sawfish (Batoidea: Sclerorhynchidae and Pristidae)

Wueringer, Barbara, Squire, Lyle and Collin, Shaun (2009) The biology of extinct and extant sawfish (Batoidea: Sclerorhynchidae and Pristidae). Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, 19 4: 445-464. doi:10.1007/s11160-009-9112-7


Author Wueringer, Barbara
Squire, Lyle
Collin, Shaun
Title The biology of extinct and extant sawfish (Batoidea: Sclerorhynchidae and Pristidae)
Journal name Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0960-3166
1573-5184
Publication date 2009-12-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11160-009-9112-7
Volume 19
Issue 4
Start page 445
End page 464
Total pages 20
Editor Jennifer L. Nielsen
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
060805 Animal Neurobiology
060801 Animal Behaviour
110906 Sensory Systems
Abstract Sclerorhynchids (extinct sawfishes, Batoidea), pristids (extant sawfish, Batoidea) and pristiophorids (sawsharks, Squalomorphi) are the three elasmobranch families that possess an elongated rostrum with lateral teeth. Sclerorhynchids are the extinct sawfishes of the Cretaceous period, which reached maximum total lengths of 100 cm. The morphology of their rostral teeth is highly variable. Pristid sawfish occur circumtropically and can reach maximum total lengths of around 700 cm. All pristid species are globally endangered due to their restricted habitat inshore. Pristiophorid sawsharks are small sharks of maximum total lengths below 150 cm, which occur in depths of 70–900 m. Close examination of the morphology of pectoral fin basals and the internal structure of the rostrum reveals that sclerorhynchids and pristids evolved independently from rhinobatids, whereas pristiophorids are squalomorph sharks. The elongation of the rostrum may be an adaptation for feeding, as all marine vertebrate taxa that possess this structure are said to use it in the context of feeding.
Formatted abstract
Sclerorhynchids (extinct sawfishes, Batoidea), pristids (extant sawfish, Batoidea) and pristiophorids (sawsharks, Squalomorphi) are the three elasmobranch families that possess an elongated rostrum with lateral teeth. Sclerorhynchids are the extinct sawfishes of the Cretaceous period, which reached maximum total lengths of 100 cm. The morphology of their rostral teeth is highly variable. Pristid sawfish occur circumtropically and can reach maximum total lengths of around 700 cm. All pristid species are globally endangered due to their restricted habitat inshore. Pristiophorid sawsharks are small sharks of maximum total lengths below 150 cm, which occur in depths of 70–900 m. Close examination of the morphology of pectoral fin basals and the internal structure of the rostrum reveals that sclerorhynchids and pristids evolved independently from rhinobatids, whereas pristiophorids are squalomorph sharks. The elongation of the rostrum may be an adaptation for feeding, as all marine vertebrate taxa that possess this structure are said to use it in the context of feeding.
Keyword Pristidae
Sclerorhynchidae
Sawfish
Shark
Elasmobranch
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 13 Nov 2009, 19:09:02 EST by Cameron Harris on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences