DIURNAL REFUGE COMPETITION IN THE FRESHWATER PRAWN, MACROBRACHIUM AUSTRALIENSE

Lammers, JH, Warburton, K and Cribb, BW (2009) DIURNAL REFUGE COMPETITION IN THE FRESHWATER PRAWN, MACROBRACHIUM AUSTRALIENSE. JOURNAL OF CRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 29 4: 476-483. doi:10.1651/08-3093.1


Author Lammers, JH
Warburton, K
Cribb, BW
Title DIURNAL REFUGE COMPETITION IN THE FRESHWATER PRAWN, MACROBRACHIUM AUSTRALIENSE
Formatted title
DIURNAL REFUGE COMPETITION IN THE FRESHWATER PRAWN, MACROBRACHIUM AUSTRALIENSE
Journal name JOURNAL OF CRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-0372
Publication date 2009-11
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1651/08-3093.1
Volume 29
Issue 4
Start page 476
End page 483
Total pages 8
Editor Humes, A.G.
Place of publication United States
Publisher Crustacean Society
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
060808 Invertebrate Biology
060204 Freshwater Ecology
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
Formatted abstract
This study examined important stimuli influencing agonistic conspecific pairs of Macrobrachium australiense and how these affected
diurnal refuge usage. The results demonstrated key behaviours underlying refuge competition, and have ramifications for how we view
the link between conspecific competition and exposure to predation. Different levels of vegetation stalk density were employed to
examine the effects of increased refuge quality on the hierarchical interaction. The data analysis demonstrated that the prawns were
responding to nearby stimuli which altered detectability, e.g., vegetation density, conspecific size, conspecific movement. Dominants
and subordinates both responded to the same stimuli, however, the behavioural response was different. Increasing subordinate size lead
to increased dominant activity in all refuges, irrespective of vegetation density. Increasing dominant size caused an increase in
subordinate activity in high density refugia but a reduction in low density refugia. The increased activity lead to an overall increase in
time spent outside of the refuge for all individuals. Subordinates spent substantially more time outside of the refuge than the dominant
individuals. As such refuge competition biases the exposure of individuals to risk, localised changes to this bias, i.e., the size of
neighbouring conspecifics, can influence this risk and determine the vulnerability of specific demographics, i.e., smaller individuals, to
predation.
Keyword behaviour
dominance hierarchy
Macrobrachium
refuge competition
vegetation refuge
DOMINANCE HIERARCHIES
AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR
HABITAT COMPLEXITY
RELATIVE SIZE
PREDATION
PREY
FISHES
RISK
PALAEMONIDAE
ROSENBERGII
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 12 Nov 2009, 11:52:26 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Biological Sciences