The Contribution of Pre-Existing Depression to the Acute Cognitive Sequelae of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Preece, Megan H. W., Geffen, Gina M. and Dougan, Brooke K. (2007). The Contribution of Pre-Existing Depression to the Acute Cognitive Sequelae of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. In: 30th Brain Impairment Conference of the Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, (70-71). 3-5 May, 2007.

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Preece_et_al_2007_ASSBI_Abstract.pdf Preece et al. (2007) Abstract for ASSBI application/pdf 47.22KB 88
Author Preece, Megan H. W.
Geffen, Gina M.
Dougan, Brooke K.
Title of paper The Contribution of Pre-Existing Depression to the Acute Cognitive Sequelae of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
Conference name 30th Brain Impairment Conference of the Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Conference dates 3-5 May, 2007
Publication Year 2007
Volume 8
Issue 1
Start page 70
End page 71
Total pages 2
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Frontotemporal abnormalities and cognitive dysfunction, especially in verbal memory and information processing speed, occur in both mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and depression. Study 1 investigated the effect of depression on cognitive performance in a sample at risk of sustaining mTBI.Seventy-eight male undergraduates completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS), Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSS), Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT), and Speed of Comprehension Test. A oneway analysis of covariance (using the top 25% and bottom 25% of DASS Depression subscale scorers) showed that HVLT recognition was significantly worse in the high scorers. Study 2 examined the effects of injury type and pre-existing depression on cognitive performance in a prospective emergency department sample (within 24 hours of injury). Fifty-eight participants with mTBI (29 with depression, 29 without depression) and 47 control participants (18 with depression, 29 without depression) completed the DSS, HVLT, and Speed of Comprehension Test. Participants with mTBI performed worse than controls (uninjured and orthopaedic-injured participants) on all tests. Participants with depression did not perform worse than participants without depression on the tests. However, there was a significant univariate interaction for HVLT recognition, participants in the mTBI group with depression exhibited worse recognition compared to participants without depression. Since word recognition was impaired in participants who were more depressed in both samples, this suggests that it is a consistent finding. More importantly, the results of Study 2 indicate that depression may interact with mTBI to impair word recognition during the acute phase after head injury.
Subjects 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Keyword mild traumatic brain injury
Concussion
depression
cognition
Recognition memory
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences - Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 11 Nov 2009, 16:02:03 EST by Miss Megan Preece on behalf of School of Psychology