Levels of Risk: Perspectives from the Lost Creek Fire

Kulig, Judith C., Edge, Dana, Reimer, William, Townshend, Ivan and Lightfoot, Nancy (2009) Levels of Risk: Perspectives from the Lost Creek Fire. The Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 24 2: 33-39.

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Author Kulig, Judith C.
Edge, Dana
Reimer, William
Townshend, Ivan
Lightfoot, Nancy
Title Levels of Risk: Perspectives from the Lost Creek Fire
Formatted title
Levels of Risk: Perspectives from the Lost Creek Fire
Journal name The Australian Journal of Emergency Management
ISSN 1324-1540
Publication date 2009-05
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 24
Issue 2
Start page 33
End page 39
Total pages 7
Editor Anita Cleaver
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Emergency Management Australia
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
920210 Nursing
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Abstract Risk has been considered as the probability of experiencing adverse events. Understanding risk and vulnerability is essential to disaster management and recovery. Through qualitative interviews in a community that experienced a wildfire, 'at-risk' and 'feeling at-risk' themes were identified for both the individuals and community in this study. Internal and external circumstances along with varying levels of dependence influenced the reports of risk. Individual and community risk during a major wildfire is discussed in order to explain links to community resiliency. Such understandings can aid in the development of appropriate measures to reduce short- and long-term impacts from natural disasters.
Formatted abstract
Risk has been considered as the probability of experiencing adverse events. Understanding risk and vulnerability is essential to disaster management and recovery. Through qualitative interviews in a community that experienced a wildfire, 'at-risk' and 'feeling at-risk' themes were identified for both the individuals and community in this study. Internal and external circumstances along with varying levels of dependence influenced the reports of risk. Individual and community risk during a major wildfire is discussed in order to explain links to community resiliency. Such understandings can aid in the development of appropriate measures to reduce short- and long-term impacts from natural disasters.
Keyword disasters
risk assessment
natural disasters
social aspects
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Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 30 Oct 2009, 14:59:35 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work