A comparison of methods for assessing the size of the population in need of alcohol treatment services in Queensland and local regions

Crook, Gabrielle M. (1996). A comparison of methods for assessing the size of the population in need of alcohol treatment services in Queensland and local regions M.A. Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Read with bookreader  the10783.pdf Full text Click to show the corresponding preview/stream application/pdf 16.18MB 145
Author Crook, Gabrielle M.
Thesis Title A comparison of methods for assessing the size of the population in need of alcohol treatment services in Queensland and local regions
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1996
Thesis type M.A. Thesis
Total pages 108
Language eng
Subjects 321200 Public Health and Health Services
Formatted abstract The purpose of this thesis was to compare two methods of estimating the in-need population for alcohol treatment services in Queensland and local regions. The two methods selected were based on: self-reported responses from the 1989-90 National Health Survey which included questions on alcohol consumption in the week prior to the survey; and the Ledermann model using sales of alcoholic beverages across Queensland in 1989-90.

A comparison of the two separate population estimates of the in-need population (i.e., the number of heavy drinkers) revealed large discrepancies between the different methodologies at the State and local regional levels. Population estimates derived from the 1989-90 National Health Survey indicated that 4.74% of all drinkers aged 15 years and over, in Queensland (n=90,461) were drinking the equivalent of six or more drinks a day. This compared with 12.18% of all drinkers aged 15 years and over in Queensland (n=232,283) derived from the Ledermann lognormal distribution of consumption model. The Ledermann estimates were also greater than the National Health Survey estimates in all local regions. However, there was great variation in the degree of difference between the two estimates across local regions.

The results of this series of studies indicated that the actual number of heavy drinkers in Queensland and local regions falls somewhere between the two estimates. The number of heavy drinkers in Queensland is probably closer to the number estimated through the survey methodology. However, the survey estimates do not reflect the variation across local regions in per capita consumption of adult drinkers. Given the advantages of survey data, including separate gender estimates and the additional information that can be generated on associated problems, it would be preferable to use survey data wherever available and acknowledge that the estimates would be less than the actual size of the population of heavy drinkers.
Keyword Alcoholism -- Treatment -- Queensland.
Alcoholism -- Treatment -- Evaluation.
Additional Notes The University of Queensland acknowledges that the copyright owner of a thesis is its author, not the University. The University has made best endeavours to obtain author permissions to include theses in this collection, however we have been unable to trace and contact all authors. If you are the author of a thesis included in this collection and we have been unable to contact you, please email espace@library.uq.edu.au.
Variant title: Assessing need for alcohol treatment services.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 249 Abstract Views, 161 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 02 Oct 2009, 10:31:31 EST by Ms Christine Heslehurst on behalf of Social Sciences and Humanities Library Service