Attitudes towards gender equity initiatives: A group-based analysis

Duck, J. M., Masser, B. M. and Terry, D. J. (2008). Attitudes towards gender equity initiatives: A group-based analysis. In: M. S. Wilson and M. Crawford, Australian Journal of Psychology : The Abstracts of the 37th Annual Meeting of Australasian Social Psychologists. 37th Annual Meeting of Australasian Social Psychologists, Wellington, New Zealand, (20-20). 27-30 March, 2008. doi:10.1080/00049530802385533


Author Duck, J. M.
Masser, B. M.
Terry, D. J.
Title of paper Attitudes towards gender equity initiatives: A group-based analysis
Conference name 37th Annual Meeting of Australasian Social Psychologists
Conference location Wellington, New Zealand
Conference dates 27-30 March, 2008
Proceedings title Australian Journal of Psychology : The Abstracts of the 37th Annual Meeting of Australasian Social Psychologists   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Basingstoke, U.K.
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Publication Year 2008
DOI 10.1080/00049530802385533
ISSN 1742-9536
0004-9530
Editor M. S. Wilson
M. Crawford
Volume 60
Issue Suppl. 1
Start page 20
End page 20
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Despite institutional commitment to equity and diversity initiatives, employees often dismiss such initiatives as “unfair” or “unnecessary” and criticise individuals who benefit from them. Our research indicates that negative attitudes towards diversity initiatives are not unique to members of the non-beneficiary group or to individuals with chronic racial or gender-based prejudices. They also reflect beliefs about the perceived legitimacy and stability of the current status relationships among the salient (gender, racial) groups and about the normative climate of opinion on diversity initiatives. In this paper we report results from experimental and field research that illustrate the explanatory role of such group-based beliefs over and above group membership and chronic individual differences. Getting to the point: Some observations on problem identification in calls between elderly people and a home-care service provider EKBERG, S., & LECOUTEUR, A. (The University of Adelaide) stuart.ekberg@adelaide.edu.au rom the beginnings of conversation analytic research in the mid 1960s, there has been a sustained interest in studying telephone interaction. A sizeable subset of this research involves the analysis of calls of an institutional order. This study, which employs data collected from an institutional provider of home-care services for independently living elderly people in Australia, examines how institutional practices are accomplished over the telephone. The methodologies of discursive psychology and conversation analysis are used to demonstrate the collaborative ways in which both clients and operators contribute to the ‘business’ of both the conversation and the home-care service itself. These observations will be discussed in relation to the strengths and weaknesses of practices that are designed to establish and maintain remote contact with clients for the purposes of providing health-care services.
Subjects 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
1701 Psychology
Keyword gender equity
attitudes
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Wed, 16 Sep 2009, 09:39:12 EST by Therese Egan on behalf of The University of Queensland Library