Eagle vs. Dragon Show Cancelled Due to Popular Uprising: A discursive analysis of US and Chinese engagement in Africa and the silencing of alternatives

Karavas, G. (2009) Eagle vs. Dragon Show Cancelled Due to Popular Uprising: A discursive analysis of US and Chinese engagement in Africa and the silencing of alternatives. Dialogue e-Journal, 7 1: 1-46.

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Author Karavas, G.
Title Eagle vs. Dragon Show Cancelled Due to Popular Uprising: A discursive analysis of US and Chinese engagement in Africa and the silencing of alternatives
Journal name Dialogue e-Journal
ISSN 1448-5605
Publication date 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 7
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 46
Total pages 46
Editor Shannon Brincat
Place of publication Brisbane
Publisher School of Political Science & International Studies, The Uniiversity of Queensland
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 360105 International Relations
C1
750700 International Relations
9403 International Relations
160607 International Relations
Abstract China’s recent engagement with Africa has attracted a significant amount of attention among United States (US) policymakers, academics, journalists and think tanks. By exploring this commentary through an emerging dominant discourse on China’s engagement in Africa, this article argues that it is interwoven with a discourse on US engagement in Africa, performing a Manichean dynamics that reflects analysis of China’s engagement in Africa through a US lens. As a result, alternative discourses and insights are silenced as China’s engagement in Africa is interpreted through issues counterpoised to those with which the US distinguishes itself. In establishing this dynamics in the dominant discourse, its rhetorical nature is further demonstrated through alternative discourses on the effects of US and Chinese engagement in Africa. Using alternative discourses to de-center the rhetoric in dominant discourses on the benefits of free markets and the disadvantages of state led development, the US and China become perceived as both engaging in Africa through existing economic and political structures in a shared pursuit of markets and resources. The effects of US and Chinese engagement are discussed in regards to these pursuits. Giving voice to alternative discourses reveals the rhetorical nature of the dominant discourses that reflect more about US values than the implications of China’s engagement in Africa.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 15 Sep 2009, 15:24:53 EST by Elmari Louise Whyte on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies