Population increase and environmental deterioration correspond with microlithic innovations in South Asia ca. 35,000 years ago

Petraglia, Michael, Clarkson, Christopher, Boivin, Nicole, Haslam, Michael, Korisettar, Ravi, Chaubey, Gyaneshwer, Ditchfield, Peter, Fuller, Dorian, James, Hannah, Jones, Sacha, Kivisild, Toomas, Koshy, Jinu, Lahr, Marta Mirazón, Metspalu, Mait, Roberts, Richard and Arnold, Lee (2009) Population increase and environmental deterioration correspond with microlithic innovations in South Asia ca. 35,000 years ago. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106 30: 12261-12266. doi:10.1073/pnas.0810842106

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Author Petraglia, Michael
Clarkson, Christopher
Boivin, Nicole
Haslam, Michael
Korisettar, Ravi
Chaubey, Gyaneshwer
Ditchfield, Peter
Fuller, Dorian
James, Hannah
Jones, Sacha
Kivisild, Toomas
Koshy, Jinu
Lahr, Marta Mirazón
Metspalu, Mait
Roberts, Richard
Arnold, Lee
Title Population increase and environmental deterioration correspond with microlithic innovations in South Asia ca. 35,000 years ago
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
1091-6490
Publication date 2009-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0810842106
Volume 106
Issue 30
Start page 12261
End page 12266
Total pages 6
Editor Randy R. Schekman
Place of publication Washington, DC, U.S.A.
Publisher National Academy of Sciences of the U.S.
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Genetic studies of South Asia's population history have led to postulations of a significant and early population expansion in the subcontinent, dating to sometime in the Late Pleistocene. We evaluate this argument, based on new mtDNA analyses, and find evidence for significant demographic transition in the subcontinent, dating to 35-28 ka. We then examine the paleoenvironmental and, particularly, archaeological records for this time period and note that this putative demographic event coincides with a period of ecological and technological change in South Asia. We document the development of a new diminutive stone blade (microlithic) technology beginning at 35-30 ka, the first time that the precocity of this transition has been recognized across the subcontinent. We argue that the transition to microlithic technology may relate to changes in subsistence practices, as increasingly large and probably fragmented populations exploited resources in contracting favorable ecological zones just before the onset of full glacial conditions.
Keyword Archaeology
Environment
Genetics
Lithic technology
mtDNA Variation
Arabian Sea
Record
East
Colonization
Revolution
Australia
Evolution
Behavior
Genomes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes This article contains supporting information online.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 04 Sep 2009, 10:26:03 EST