Glycosaminoglycan composition changes with MG-63 osteosarcoma osteogenesis in vitro and induces human mesenchymal stem cell aggregation

Kumarasuriyar, A., Murali, S., Nurcombe, V. and Cool, S. M. (2009) Glycosaminoglycan composition changes with MG-63 osteosarcoma osteogenesis in vitro and induces human mesenchymal stem cell aggregation. Journal of Cellular Physiology, 218 3: 501-511. doi:10.1002/jcp.21620


Author Kumarasuriyar, A.
Murali, S.
Nurcombe, V.
Cool, S. M.
Title Glycosaminoglycan composition changes with MG-63 osteosarcoma osteogenesis in vitro and induces human mesenchymal stem cell aggregation
Journal name Journal of Cellular Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9541
1097-4652
Publication date 2009-03-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jcp.21620
Volume 218
Issue 3
Start page 501
End page 511
Total pages 12
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, U.S.A.
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
060103 Cell Development, Proliferation and Death
Formatted abstract
Osteogenic differentiation is coordinated by the exposure of cells to temporal changes in a combination of growth factors and elements within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many of the key proteins that drive these changes share the property of being dependent on ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) for their activity. Here, we examined whether GAGs isolated from proliferating, differentiating and mineralizing MG-63 osteosarcoma cells differed in their physical properties, and thus in their capacities to coordinate the osteogenic cascade both in human MG-63 osteosarcoma cells and primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Our results show that the size distribution of GAGs, the expression of GAG-carrying proteoglycan cores and the expression of enzymes involved in their modification systematically change as MG-63 cells mature in culture. When dosed back onto cells exogenously in soluble form, GAGs regulated MG-63 survival and growth in a dose-dependent manner, but not differentiation in either cell type. In contrast, hMSCs aggregated into distinct colonies when grown on GAG-coated substrates, while MG-63 cells did not. Heparin-coated substrates improved hMSC viability without inducing aggregation. These results suggest a complex role for GAGs in coordinating the emergence of the osteoblast phenotype, and provide further evidence for the use of heparans in bone tissue repair applications.
Keyword Fibroblast-growth-factor
Heparan-sulfate proteoglycans
Colony-stimulating factor
Molecular-weight heparin
Osteoblast-like cells
Chondroitin sulfate
Endochondral ossification
Differentiation marker
Surface expression
Mitogenic activity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 5 NOV 2008.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 04 Sep 2009, 02:02:56 EST by Cameron Harris on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences