Accidental Authors – Students experiment with making writing explicit during their Research Higher Degree

Naomi Anastasi (2009). Accidental Authors – Students experiment with making writing explicit during their Research Higher Degree MPhil Thesis, English, Media Studies and Art History, The University of Queensland.

       
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_30246234____Master_of_Philosophy__totalthesis.pdf Final Thesis Lodgement application/pdf 725.46KB 30
_30246234_____Master_of_philosophy__abstract.pdf Abstract application/pdf 24.91KB 10
Author Naomi Anastasi
Thesis Title Accidental Authors – Students experiment with making writing explicit during their Research Higher Degree
School, Centre or Institute English, Media Studies and Art History
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2009-02
Thesis type MPhil Thesis
Supervisor Dr Catherine Manathunga
Dr Joan Leach
Total pages 100
Total black and white pages 100
Subjects 420000 Language and Culture
Abstract/Summary The implicit position of writing during Research Higher Degree (RHD) candidature shapes how students in science approach the task of writing their theses. The dedication of universities to the principles of research has pushed writing to the fringes of the research higher degree. When writing is pushed to the fringes, it is rarely taught explicitly as an integral part of the postgraduate program. This research has found that students who are concerned with writing a thesis often require writing to be discussed explicitly during their education. In response to the absence of explicit instruction on writing, students turn to the principles of research to discover how to write their theses. However, students find that writing belongs to a different epistemological tradition than scientific research. This investigation found that as students realise that research is different from writing, they often write their theses by mimicking the work of other published authors in the same field. These findings emerge from eight semi–structured interviews with linguistically homologous students from a science faculty at a research-intensive university in Australia. These interviews show that students are initiating their own writing groups to learn more about writing. This research presents a case study which culminates in recommendations about how to re-position writing as an explicit discourse requiring attention during the research higher degree. These writing recommendations are developed in this research by analysing the principles of writing programs, examining the literature on writing groups, and reflecting the experience of students during the research higher degree.
Keyword Writing, research higher degree, students, supervision, writing groups.

 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 15:02:35 EST by Ms Naomi Anastasi on behalf of Library - Information Access Service