Operational trials of remote mosquito trap systems for Japanese encephalitis virus surveillance in the Torres Strait, Australia

Ritchie, Scott A., van Den Hurk, Andrew F., Zborowski, Paul, Kerlin, Tim J., Banks, David, Walker, James A., Lee, Jonathan M., Montgomery, Brian L., Smith, Greg A., Pyke, Alyssa T. and Smith, Ina L. (2007) Operational trials of remote mosquito trap systems for Japanese encephalitis virus surveillance in the Torres Strait, Australia. Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 7 4: 497-506. doi:10.1089/vbz.2006.0643


Author Ritchie, Scott A.
van Den Hurk, Andrew F.
Zborowski, Paul
Kerlin, Tim J.
Banks, David
Walker, James A.
Lee, Jonathan M.
Montgomery, Brian L.
Smith, Greg A.
Pyke, Alyssa T.
Smith, Ina L.
Title Operational trials of remote mosquito trap systems for Japanese encephalitis virus surveillance in the Torres Strait, Australia
Journal name Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1530-3667
1557-7759
Publication date 2007-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1089/vbz.2006.0643
Volume 7
Issue 4
Start page 497
End page 506
Total pages 10
Place of publication New Rochelle, NY, United States
Publisher Mary Ann Leibert
Language eng
Subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
0605 Microbiology
Abstract Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) appears nearly annually in the Torres Strait in far northern Queensland, Australia, and is a threat to invade the Australian mainland. Surveillance has involved the use of sentinel pigs that develop detectable viremias and antibody titers to JEV. However, pigs are amplifying hosts for JEV, and thus pose a health risk to the public and to pig handlers who bleed the pigs. A remote mosquito trap system would not have these risks. We report on trials using a remote mosquito trap system for the surveillance of JEV in the Torres Strait. The Mosquito Magnet (MM) Pro®, MM Liberty Plus®, and a novel updraft trap, the NAQS Mozzie Trap, were run at Badu and Moa islands in the Torres Strait and at Bamaga in the northern Cape York Peninsula from 2002-2005. TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect JEV nucleic acid in weekly mosquito collections. Sentinel pigs located at Badu were also bled and the serum processed by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR for JEV antigen and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-JEV antibodies. JEV was detected in mosquito collections each year but not in each trap. No JEV was detected in trapped mosquitoes before detection in sentinel pigs. The mosquito trap system cost ca. AU$10,000 per site, about AU$5,000 less than a pig-based system. However, trap failures caused by mosquito-clogged motors, electrical faults, and blocked gas lines reduced the efficacy of some mosquito traps. Nonetheless, a remote mosquito trap system, employing stand alone traps and PCR for viral antigen detection, can be a safe, economical way to detect arbovirus activity in remote areas.
Keyword Japanese encephalitis virus
CULEX-GELIDUS
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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