Does body mass index affect progression-free or overall survival in patients with ovarian cancer? Results from SCOTROC I trial

Barrett, S.V., Paul, J., Hay, A., Vasey, P.A., Kaye, S.B. and Glasspool, R.M. (2008) Does body mass index affect progression-free or overall survival in patients with ovarian cancer? Results from SCOTROC I trial. Annals of Oncology, 19 5: 898-902. doi:10.1093/annonc/mdm606


Author Barrett, S.V.
Paul, J.
Hay, A.
Vasey, P.A.
Kaye, S.B.
Glasspool, R.M.
Title Does body mass index affect progression-free or overall survival in patients with ovarian cancer? Results from SCOTROC I trial
Journal name Annals of Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0923-7534
1569-8041
Publication date 2008-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdm606
Volume 19
Issue 5
Start page 898
End page 902
Total pages 5
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:
Previous studies have indicated an association between obesity and poor survival in several tumour types, including ovarian cancer. We sought to test the hypothesis that obesity reduces survival in a large, well-characterised and relatively homogeneous cohort of ovarian cancer patients.

Patients and methods:
The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in 1067 patients participating in the Scottish Randomised Trial in Ovarian Cancer I trial was assessed. All patients received first-line carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. The dose of carboplatin was determined by a measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR), ensuring accurate dosing in all categories of BMI and the dose of taxane was not capped. Patients were assigned to one of four categories: Underweight (BMI < 18.5), ideal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9), overweight (BMI 25-29.9) or obese (BMI ≥ 30).

Results:

There were neither statistically significant differences in PFS or OS between these four groups nor were there any differences in taxane or carboplatin dose intensity. Furthermore, there was no association between BMI and tumour stage or grade at presentation, or completeness of debulking surgery.

Conclusions:
Obese patients with epithelial ovarian cancer do not have a poorer prognosis, provided that they receive optimal doses of chemotherapy based on measured GFR and actual body weight.
Keyword Body mass index
Ovarian cancer
Survival
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 10:06:32 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Medicine