Does self-directed and web-based support for parents enhance the effects of viewing a reality television series based on the Triple P-Positive Parenting Programme?

Sanders, Matthew, Calam, Rachel, Durand, Marianne, Liversidge, Tom and Carmont, Sue Ann (2008) Does self-directed and web-based support for parents enhance the effects of viewing a reality television series based on the Triple P-Positive Parenting Programme?. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49 9: 924-932. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01901.x


Author Sanders, Matthew
Calam, Rachel
Durand, Marianne
Liversidge, Tom
Carmont, Sue Ann
Title Does self-directed and web-based support for parents enhance the effects of viewing a reality television series based on the Triple P-Positive Parenting Programme?
Journal name Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9630
1469-7610
Publication date 2008-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01901.x
Volume 49
Issue 9
Start page 924
End page 932
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford, UK
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Subject 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
 Background: This study investigated whether providing self-directed and web-based support for parents enhanced the effects of viewing a reality television series based on the Triple P – Positive Parenting Programme. Method: Parents with a child aged 2 to 9 (N = 454) were randomly assigned to either a standard or enhanced intervention condition. In the standard television alone viewing condition, parents watched the six-episode weekly television series, 'Driving Mum and Dad Mad'. Parents in the enhanced television viewing condition received a self-help workbook, extra web support involving downloadable parenting tip sheets, audio and video streaming of positive parenting messages and email support, in addition to viewing the television series. Results: Parents in both conditions reported significant improvements in their child's disruptive behaviour and improvements in dysfunctional parenting practices. Effects were greater for the enhanced condition as seen on the ECBI, two of the three parenting indicators and overall programme satisfaction. However, no significant differences were seen on other measures, including parent affect indicators. The level of improvement was related to number of episodes watched, with greatest changes occurring in families who watched each episode. Improvements achieved at post-intervention by parents in both groups were maintained at six-month follow-up. Online tip sheets were frequently accessed; uptake of web-based resources was highest early in the series. Conclusions: The value of combining self-help approaches, technology and media as part of a comprehensive public health approach to providing parenting support is discussed.
Keyword Parent training
Conduct problems
Media intervention
Prevention
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 09:38:19 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences