Assessing emotional status following acquired brain injury: The clinical potential of the depression, anxiety and stress scales

Ownsworth, Tamara, Little, Trudi, Turner, Ben, Hawkes, Anna and Shum, David (2008) Assessing emotional status following acquired brain injury: The clinical potential of the depression, anxiety and stress scales. Brain Injury, 22 11: 858-869. doi:10.1080/02699050802446697


Author Ownsworth, Tamara
Little, Trudi
Turner, Ben
Hawkes, Anna
Shum, David
Title Assessing emotional status following acquired brain injury: The clinical potential of the depression, anxiety and stress scales
Journal name Brain Injury   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-9052
1362-301X
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02699050802446697
Volume 22
Issue 11
Start page 858
End page 869
Total pages 12
Place of publication London, United Kindgom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Formatted abstract Primary objective: To investigate the clinical potential of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS 42) and its
shorter version (DASS 21) for assessing emotional status following acquired brain injury.
Methods and procedures: Participants included 23 individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), 25 individuals with brain
tumour and 29 non-clinical controls. Investigations of internal consistency, test–re-test reliability, theory-consistent
differences, sensitivity to change and concurrent validity were conducted.
Main outcomes and results: Internal consistency of the DASS was generally acceptable (r>0.70), with the exception of the
anxiety scale for the TBI sample. Test–re-test reliability (1–3 weeks) was sound for the depression scale (r>0.75) and
significant but comparatively lower for other scales (r¼0.60–0.73, p<0.01). Theory-consistent differences were only
evident between the brain tumour sample and non-clinical control sample on the anxiety scale ( p<0.01). Sensitivity to
change of the DASS in the context of hospital discharge was demonstrated for depression and stress ( p<0.01), but not for
anxiety ( p>0.05). Concurrent validity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was significant for all scales of the
DASS ( p<0.05).
Conclusions: While the results generally support the clinical application of the DASS following ABI, further research
examining the factor structure of existing and modified versions of the DASS is recommended.
Keyword Acquired brain injury
Assessment
Emotional status
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 09:19:06 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences