A comparison of the effectiveness of bat detectors and harp traps for surveying bats in an urban landscape

Hourigan, C. L., Catterall, Carla P., Jones, Darryl and Rhodes, Martin (2008) A comparison of the effectiveness of bat detectors and harp traps for surveying bats in an urban landscape. Wildlife Research, 35 8: 768-774. doi:10.1071/WR07154


Author Hourigan, C. L.
Catterall, Carla P.
Jones, Darryl
Rhodes, Martin
Title A comparison of the effectiveness of bat detectors and harp traps for surveying bats in an urban landscape
Journal name Wildlife Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1035-3712
1448-5494
Publication date 2008-12-16
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/WR07154
Volume 35
Issue 8
Start page 768
End page 774
Total pages 7
Place of publication Collingwood, VIC, Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract Obtaining adequate information for informed conservation-management decisions requires effective and cost-efficient survey techniques. We compared the effectiveness of bat detectors and harp traps for surveying bat assemblages within an urban landscape in Brisbane, Australia, with respect to number and composition of species. Nine sites within each of three habitat types (remnant bushland, parkland, and low-density residential – a total of 27 sites) were sampled twice each. The bat detectors recorded 3628 calls, from which 13 taxa were identified. The harp traps captured 17 individuals, from which five taxa were identified. All species captured by harp trap were also detected by bat detector, with the possible exception of N. bifax. Bat detectors recorded significantly more species per site than were captured by harp traps, both overall and within each of the three habitat types. And although a considerable amount of time and expense was required to identify the recorded echolocation calls to species, bat detectors were also the most cost-efficient sampling method. These results collectively show that bat detectors were the most effective and cost-efficient method for surveying the bat assemblage in this urban landscape.
Keyword South-eastern Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: University of Queensland Library Staff Publications and Presentations
 
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