Home range dynamics of the yellow-footed rock-wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus celeris) in central-western Queensland

Sharp, A (2009) Home range dynamics of the yellow-footed rock-wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus celeris) in central-western Queensland. AUSTRAL ECOLOGY, 34 1: 55-68. doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2008.01882.x


Author Sharp, A
Title Home range dynamics of the yellow-footed rock-wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus celeris) in central-western Queensland
Formatted title
Home range dynamics of the yellow-footed rock-wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus celeris) in central-western Queensland
Journal name AUSTRAL ECOLOGY   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1442-9993
1442-9985
Publication date 2009-02
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2008.01882.x
Volume 34
Issue 1
Start page 55
End page 68
Total pages 14
Editor Michael Bull
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
060207 Population Ecology
Abstract Analyses of the interspecific differences in macropod home range size suggest that habitat productivity exerts a greater influence on range size than does body mass. This relationship is also apparent within the rock-wallaby genus. Lim reported that yellow-footed rock-wallabies (Petrogale xanthopus xanthopus) inhabiting the semi-arid Flinders Ranges (South Australia) had a mean home range of 170 ha. While consistent with the hypothesis that species inhabiting less productive habitats will require larger ranges to fulfil their energetic requirements, the ranges reported by Lim were considerably larger than those observed for heavier sympatric macropods. The aim of the current study was to document the home range dynamics of P. x. celeris in central-western Queensland and undertake a comparison with those reported for their southern counterparts. Wallaby movements were monitored at Idalia National Park, between winter 1992 and winter 1994. Male foraging ranges (95% fixed kernel; 15.4 ha, SD = ±7.8 ha) were found to be significantly larger than those of female wallabies (11.3 ha, SD = ±4.9 ha). Because of varying distances to the wallabies' favoured foraging ground (i.e. an adjacent herb field), the direction in which the wallabies moved to forage also significantly affected range size. Mean home range size was estimated to be 23.5 ha (SD = ±15.2 ha; 95% fixed kernel) and 67.5 ha (SD = ±22.4 ha; 100% minimum convex polygon). The discrepancy between these two estimates resulted from the exclusion of locations, from the 95% kernel estimates, when the wallabies moved to a water source 1.5 km distant from the colony site. The observed foraging and home ranges approximated those that could be expected for a macropod inhabiting the semi-arid zone (i.e. 2.4 times larger-than-predicted from body mass alone). Possible reasons for the disparity between the current study and that of Lim are examined.
Keyword Foraging range
Home range
Movement pattern
Petrogale xanthopus celeris
Yellow-footed rock-wallaby
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 09:02:46 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Biological Sciences