Using the recovery knowledge inventory (RKI) to assess the effectiveness of a consumer-led recovery training program for service providers

Meehan, Thomas and Glover, Helen (2009) Using the recovery knowledge inventory (RKI) to assess the effectiveness of a consumer-led recovery training program for service providers. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 32 3: 223-226. doi:10.2975/32.3.2009.223.226


Author Meehan, Thomas
Glover, Helen
Title Using the recovery knowledge inventory (RKI) to assess the effectiveness of a consumer-led recovery training program for service providers
Journal name Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1095-158X
1559-3126
Publication date 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2975/32.3.2009.223.226
Volume 32
Issue 3
Start page 223
End page 226
Total pages 4
Place of publication Boston, MA, United States
Publisher Boston University
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: This Australian study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a consumer-led recovery training program. Methods: A non-equivalent control group study design was used to assess changes in recovery knowledge and attitudes pre-training, immediately post-training, and at 6 months post-training. Results: Relative to the comparison group, those receiving training demonstrated significant gains in knowledge at follow-up. Conclusions: A consumer-led training program was able to improve provider knowledge of recovery based practice. While the RKI was developed in the USA, it proved to be a useful measure of change in an Australian sample.
Keyword Recovery
Providers
Training
Evaluation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Issue: Winter 2009

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 09:01:24 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Psychiatry - Princess Alexandra Hospital