Reproductive periodicity, localised movements and behavioural segregation of pregnant Carcharias taurus at Wolf Rock, Southeast Queensland, Australia

Bansemer, C. S. and Bennett, M. B. (2009) Reproductive periodicity, localised movements and behavioural segregation of pregnant Carcharias taurus at Wolf Rock, Southeast Queensland, Australia. Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 374 215-227. doi:10.3354/meps07741


Author Bansemer, C. S.
Bennett, M. B.
Title Reproductive periodicity, localised movements and behavioural segregation of pregnant Carcharias taurus at Wolf Rock, Southeast Queensland, Australia
Formatted title
Reproductive periodicity, localised movements and behavioural segregation of pregnant Carcharias taurus at Wolf Rock, Southeast Queensland, Australia
Journal name Marine Ecology - Progress Series   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0171-8630
1616-1599
Publication date 2009-01-13
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3354/meps07741
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 374
Start page 215
End page 227
Total pages 13
Editor Otto Kinne
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publisher Inter-Research Science Centre
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We examined grey nurse shark Carcharias taurus utilisation of Wolf Rock (which is located within a marine sanctuary zone and is the most northern known aggregation site on the eastern Australian seaboard) between December 2002 and February 2008 using underwater censuses, photo-identification and acoustic tracking of individual sharks. Photo-identification surveys identified 181 individual C. taurus (161 mature females, 1 immature female and 19 mature males). Eighty-one of these were re-identified at least once at Wolf Rock (77 females and 4 males) between December 2002 and February 2008. A biennial reproductive cycle was indicated for 18 out of 28 females for which re-identifications spanned at least 2 mating and/or pregnancy events. Re-identifications of 9 out of 28 female sharks suggest that, on occasion, there may be 3 yr between pregnancy events. Male C. taurus were observed between July and January, but were absent between February and April. Fresh mating scars on female sharks were observed in late November and December and pregnancies were visible from late-February. Many pregnant sharks remained at Wolf Rock until August or September (9 to 10 mo post-mating) and demonstrated strong site attachment with 78 to 90% of their time spent within 500 m of the Wolf Rock aggregation site. C. taurus is listed as critically endangered along the east coast of Australia and there is concern about their population’s resilience globally. The improved knowledge of the reproductive periodicity of C. taurus and their behaviour during pregnancy will provide valuable information to assist with management throughout their distribution.
Keyword Aggregation
Site fidelity
Acoustic telemetry
Photo identification
Visual survey
Seasonal distribution patterns
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:44:23 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences