Nesting, foraging and aggression of Noisy Miners relative to road edges in an extensive Queensland forest

Maron, Martine (2009) Nesting, foraging and aggression of Noisy Miners relative to road edges in an extensive Queensland forest. Emu, 109 1: 75-81. doi:10.1071/MU08064


Author Maron, Martine
Title Nesting, foraging and aggression of Noisy Miners relative to road edges in an extensive Queensland forest
Journal name Emu   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0158-4197
1448-5540
Publication date 2009-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MU08064
Volume 109
Issue 1
Start page 75
End page 81
Total pages 7
Place of publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Increased abundance of Noisy Miners (Manorina melanocephala), a large, aggressive honeyeater, is one of the most important mechanisms through which habitat fragmentation and degradation threaten populations of eastern Australian woodland birds. In inland Queensland, however, Noisy Miners dominate avian assemblages throughout extensive forest areas as well as fragmented landscapes, and our understanding of the factors influencing their behaviour and habitat selection in such relatively intact landscapes is limited. I investigated how road edges influenced Noisy Miners by comparing the species' aggressive and foraging behaviour, and location of nests, between road-edge and interior transects in a southern Queensland forest. I also investigated Noisy Miner foraging microhabitat preferences and targets of aggression. Noisy Miner nests were more likely to be located near to road edges, but foraging and aggressive interactions occurred with similar frequency near and far from road edges. Such interactions selectively targeted close competitors and a nest predator. Most foraging activity was in the canopy, and selectively within ironbarks (Eucalyptus spp.), suggesting that higher densities of Noisy Miners in more open areas of the forest are unlikely to be related to facilitation of ground-foraging activity. Despite some evidence of a preference for nesting near road openings, road edges do not appear to influence Noisy Miners as strongly as edges between forest and agricultural land do elsewhere in eastern Australia. © Royal Australasian Orinthologists Union 2009.
Keyword Brigalow belt
BIRDS
Competiton
Interspecific aggression
Nest location
Roads
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:31:48 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management