Social influence in the theory of planned behaviour: The role of descriptive, injunctive, and in-group norms

White, Katherine M., Smith, Joanne R., Terry, Deborah J., Greenslade, Jaimi H. and McKimmie, Blake M. (2009) Social influence in the theory of planned behaviour: The role of descriptive, injunctive, and in-group norms. British Journal of Social Psychology, 48 1: 135-158. doi:10.1348/014466608X295207


Author White, Katherine M.
Smith, Joanne R.
Terry, Deborah J.
Greenslade, Jaimi H.
McKimmie, Blake M.
Title Social influence in the theory of planned behaviour: The role of descriptive, injunctive, and in-group norms
Journal name British Journal of Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0144-6665
Publication date 2009-03
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1348/014466608X295207
Volume 48
Issue 1
Start page 135
End page 158
Total pages 24
Editor John Dixon
Jolanda Jetten
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher The British Psychological Society
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract The present research investigated three approaches to the role of norms in the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Two studies examined the proposed predictors of intentions to engage in household recycling (Studies 1 and 2) and reported recycling behaviour (Study 1). Study 1 tested the impact of descriptive and injunctive norms (personal and social) and the moderating role of self-monitoring on norm-intention relations. Study 2 examined the role of group norms and group identification and the moderating role of collective self on norm-intention relations. Both studies demonstrated support for the TPB and the inclusion of additional normative variables: attitudes; perceived behavioural control; descriptive; and personal injunctive norms (but not social injunctive norm) emerged as significant independent predictors of intentions. There was no evidence that the impact of norms on intentions varied as a function of the dispositional variables of self-monitoring (Study 1) or the collective self (Study 2). There was support, however, for the social identity approach to attitude-behaviour relations in that group norms predicted recycling intentions, particularly for individuals who identified strongly with the group. The results of these two studies highlight the critical role of social influence processes within the TPB and the attitude-behaviour context.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 08:30:00 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology