Are snakes and spiders special? Acquisition of negative valence and modified attentional processing by non-fear-relevant animal stimuli

Purkis, Helena M. and Lipp, Ottmar V. (2009) Are snakes and spiders special? Acquisition of negative valence and modified attentional processing by non-fear-relevant animal stimuli. Cognition & Emotion, 23 3: 430-452. doi:10.1080/02699930801993973


Author Purkis, Helena M.
Lipp, Ottmar V.
Title Are snakes and spiders special? Acquisition of negative valence and modified attentional processing by non-fear-relevant animal stimuli
Journal name Cognition & Emotion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-9931
Publication date 2009-04
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02699930801993973
Volume 23
Issue 3
Start page 430
End page 452
Total pages 23
Editor Dirk Hermans
Jan De Houwer
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Psychology Press
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
C1
Abstract Abstract Previous research has demonstrated differences in processing between fear-relevant stimuli, such as snakes and spiders, and non-fear-relevant stimuli. The current research examined whether non-fear-relevant animal stimuli, such as dogs, birds and fish, were processed like fear-relevant stimuli following aversive learning. Pictures of a priori fear-relevant animals, snakes and spiders, were evaluated as negative in affective priming and ratings and were preferentially attended to in a visual search task. Pictures of dogs, birds and fish that had been trained as CS+ in an aversive conditioning design were evaluated more negatively and facilitated dot probe detection relative to CS- pictures. The current studies demonstrated that stimuli viewed as positive prior to aversive learning were negative and were preferentially attended to after a brief learning episode. We propose that aversive learning may provide a mechanism for the acquisition of stimulus fear relevance.
Keyword SKIN-CONDUCTANCE RESPONSES
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 08:29:56 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology