Vertex corrections and the Korringa ratio in strongly correlated electron materials

Yusuf, Eddy, Powell, B. J. and McKenzie, Ross H. (2009) Vertex corrections and the Korringa ratio in strongly correlated electron materials. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, 21 19: 1-5. doi:10.1088/0953-8984/21/19/195601


Author Yusuf, Eddy
Powell, B. J.
McKenzie, Ross H.
Title Vertex corrections and the Korringa ratio in strongly correlated electron materials
Journal name Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0953-8984
1361-648X
Publication date 2009-04-07
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1088/0953-8984/21/19/195601
Volume 21
Issue 19
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Editor D. K. Ferry
Place of publication Bristol, United Kingdom
Publisher Institute of Physics
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
0204 Condensed Matter Physics
970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
Formatted abstract
We show that the Korringa ratio, associated with nuclear magnetic resonance in metals, is unity if vertex corrections to the dynamic spin susceptibility are negligible, the hyperfine coupling is momentum independent, and there exists an energy scale below which the density of states is constant. In the absence of vertex corrections we also find a Korringa behaviour for T1, the nuclear spin relaxation rate, i.e., 1/T1 ∝ T , and a temperature independent Knight shift. These results are independent of the form and magnitude of the self-energy (so far as is consistent with neglecting vertex corrections) and of the dimensionality of the system. 
Keyword High-temperature superconductivity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 08:15:56 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Mathematics & Physics