Measurement Properties of the Australian Women's Activity Survey

Fjeldsoe, Brianna S., Marshall, Alison L. and Miller, Yvette D. (2009) Measurement Properties of the Australian Women's Activity Survey. Medicine and Science in Sports and Excercise, 41 5: 1020-1033. doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e31819461c2


Author Fjeldsoe, Brianna S.
Marshall, Alison L.
Miller, Yvette D.
Title Measurement Properties of the Australian Women's Activity Survey
Journal name Medicine and Science in Sports and Excercise   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0195-9131
Publication date 2009-05
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31819461c2
Volume 41
Issue 5
Start page 1020
End page 1033
Total pages 14
Editor Andrew J Young
Kenneth O Wilson
Place of publication United States
Publisher Lippincott Willams & Wilkins
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
97 Expanding Knowledge
Abstract Purpose: The Australian Women's Activity Survey (AWAS) was developed based on a systematic review and qualitative research on how to measure activity patterns of women with young children (WYC). AWAS assesses activity performed across five domains (planned activities, employment, child care, domestic responsibilities, and transport) and intensity levels (sitting, light intensity, brisk walking, moderate intensity, and vigorous intensity) in a typical week in the past month. The purpose of this study was to assess the test-retest reliability and criterion validity of the AWAS. Methods: WYC completed the AWAS on two occasions 7 d apart (test-retest reliability protocol) and/or wore a Manufacturing Technology Inc. (MTI) ActiGraph accelerometer for 7 d in between (validity protocol). Forty WYC (mean age 35 ± 5 yr) completed the test-retest reliability protocol and 75 WYC (mean age 33 ± 5 yr) completed the validity protocol. Interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between AWAS administrations and Spearman's correlation coefficients (rs) between AWAS and MTI data were calculated. Results: AWAS showed good test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.80 (0.65-0.89)) and acceptable criterion validity (rs = 0.28, P = 0.01) for measuring weekly health-enhancing physical activity. AWAS also provided repeatable and valid estimates of sitting time (test-retest reliability, ICC = 0.42 (0.13-0.64); criterion validity, rs = 0.32, (P = 0.006)). Conclusion: The measurement properties of the AWAS are comparable to those reported for existing self-report measures of physical activity. However, AWAS offers a more comprehensive and flexible alternative for accurately assessing different domains and intensities of activity relevant to WYC. Future research should investigate whether the AWAS is a suitable measure of intervention efficacy by examining its sensitivity to change.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: The Australian Women's Activity Survey (AWAS) was developed based on a systematic review and qualitative research on how to measure activity patterns of women with young children (WYC). AWAS assesses activity performed across five domains (planned activities, employment, child care, domestic responsibilities, and transport) and intensity levels (sitting, light intensity, brisk walking, moderate intensity, and vigorous intensity) in a typical week in the past month. The purpose of this study was to assess the test-retest reliability and criterion validity of the AWAS.

Methods: WYC completed the AWAS on two occasions 7 d apart (test-retest reliability protocol) and/or wore a Manufacturing Technology Inc. (MTI) ActiGraph accelerometer for 7 d in between (validity protocol). Forty WYC (mean age 35 ± 5 yr) completed the test-retest reliability protocol and 75 WYC (mean age 33 ± 5 yr) completed the validity protocol. Interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between AWAS administrations and Spearman's correlation coefficients (rs) between AWAS and MTI data were calculated.

Results: AWAS showed good test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.80 (0.65-0.89)) and acceptable criterion validity (rs = 0.28, P = 0.01) for measuring weekly health-enhancing physical activity. AWAS also provided repeatable and valid estimates of sitting time (test-retest reliability, ICC = 0.42 (0.13-0.64); criterion validity, rs = 0.32, (P = 0.006)).

Conclusion: The measurement properties of the AWAS are comparable to those reported for existing self-report measures of physical activity. However, AWAS offers a more comprehensive and flexible alternative for accurately assessing different domains and intensities of activity relevant to WYC. Future research should investigate whether the AWAS is a suitable measure of intervention efficacy by examining its sensitivity to change.
Keyword physical activity
mothers
reliability
validity
accuracy
accelerometers
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 08:15:36 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology