The effects of ecologically determined spatial complexity on the classification accuracy of simulated coral reef images

Lim, Alan, Hedley, John D., LeDrew, Ellsworth, Mumby, Peter J. and Roelfsema, Chris (2009) The effects of ecologically determined spatial complexity on the classification accuracy of simulated coral reef images. Remote Sensing of Environment, 113 5: 965-978. doi:10.1016/j.rse.2009.01.011


Author Lim, Alan
Hedley, John D.
LeDrew, Ellsworth
Mumby, Peter J.
Roelfsema, Chris
Title The effects of ecologically determined spatial complexity on the classification accuracy of simulated coral reef images
Journal name Remote Sensing of Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0034-4257
Publication date 2009-05-15
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.rse.2009.01.011
Volume 113
Issue 5
Start page 965
End page 978
Total pages 14
Editor Marvin E. Bauer
Place of publication New York, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 0502 Environmental Science and Management
Formatted abstract
Numerous studies have been conducted to compare the classification accuracy of coral reef maps produced from satellite and aerial imagery with different sensor characteristics such as spatial or spectral resolution, or under different environmental conditions. However, in additional to these physical environment and sensor design factors, the ecologically determined spatial complexity of the reef itself presents significant challenges for remote sensing objectives. While previous studies have considered the spatial resolution of the sensors, none have directly drawn the link from sensor spatial resolution to the scale and patterns in the heterogeneity of reef benthos. In this paper, we will study how the accuracy of a commonly used maximum likelihood classification (MLC) algorithm is affected by spatial elements typical of a Caribbean atoll system present in high spectral and spatial resolution imagery.

The results indicate that the degree to which ecologically determined spatial factors influence accuracy is dependent on both the amount of coral cover on the reef and the spatial resolution of the images being classified, and may be a contributing factor to the differences in the accuracies obtained for mapping reefs in different geographical locations. Differences in accuracy are also obtained due to the methods of pixel selection for training the maximum likelihood classification algorithm. With respect to estimation of live coral cover, a method which randomly selects training samples from all samples in each class provides better estimates for lower resolution images while a method biased to select the pixels with the highest substrate purity gave better estimations for higher resolution images.
© 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keyword Coral reefs
Classification
Hyperspectral
Accuracy
Size-frequency distribution
Colony clustering
Coral cover
Size-frequency distributions
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 08:12:37 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Research Management Office