Genetic covariation between the author recognition test and reading and verbal abilities: What can we learn from the analysis of high performance?

Martin, Nicolas W., Hansell, Narelle K., Wainwright, Mark A., Shekar, Sri N., Medland, Sarah E., Bates, Timothy C., Burt, Jennifer S., Martin, Nicholas G. and Wright, Margaret J. (2009) Genetic covariation between the author recognition test and reading and verbal abilities: What can we learn from the analysis of high performance?. Behavior Genetics, 39 4: 417-426. doi:10.1007/s10519-009-9275-y


Author Martin, Nicolas W.
Hansell, Narelle K.
Wainwright, Mark A.
Shekar, Sri N.
Medland, Sarah E.
Bates, Timothy C.
Burt, Jennifer S.
Martin, Nicholas G.
Wright, Margaret J.
Title Genetic covariation between the author recognition test and reading and verbal abilities: What can we learn from the analysis of high performance?
Journal name Behavior Genetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-8244
1573-3297
Publication date 2009-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10519-009-9275-y
Volume 39
Issue 4
Start page 417
End page 426
Total pages 10
Editor John K Hewitt
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
920410 Mental Health
111714 Mental Health
Formatted abstract
The Author Recognition Test (ART) measures print exposure and is a unique predictor of phonological and orthographic processes in reading. In a sample of adolescent and young adult twins and siblings (216 MZ/430 DZ pairs, 307 singletons; aged 11–29 years) ART scores were moderately heritable (67%) and correlated with reading and verbal abilities, with genes largely accounting for the covariance. We also examine whether high (and low) (i.e. 1SD above the mean) represents a quantitative extreme of the normal distribution. Heritability for high ART was of similar magnitude to the full sample, but, a specific genetic factor, independent from both low ART performance and high reading ability, accounted for 53–58% of the variance. This suggests a distinct genetic etiology for high ART ability and we speculate that the specific genetic influence is on orthographical processing, a critical factor in developing word recognition skills.
Keyword Print exposure
Verbal abilities
Reading
Twins
Quantitative genetics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:03:20 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology