Searching for Differences in Race: Is There Evidence for Preferential Detection of Other-Race Faces?

Lipp, Ottmar V., Terry, Deborah J., Smith, Joanne R., Tellegen, Cassandra L., Kuebbeler, Jennifer and Newey, Mareka (2009) Searching for Differences in Race: Is There Evidence for Preferential Detection of Other-Race Faces?. Emotion, 9 3: 350-360. doi:10.1037/a0015530


Author Lipp, Ottmar V.
Terry, Deborah J.
Smith, Joanne R.
Tellegen, Cassandra L.
Kuebbeler, Jennifer
Newey, Mareka
Title Searching for Differences in Race: Is There Evidence for Preferential Detection of Other-Race Faces?
Journal name Emotion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1528-3542
Publication date 2009-06
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0015530
Volume 9
Issue 3
Start page 350
End page 360
Total pages 11
Editor Dr. Elizabeth A Phelps
Place of publication United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 170113 Social and Community Psychology
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
C1
Abstract Previous research has suggested that like animal and social fear-relevant stimuli, other-race faces (African American) are detected preferentially in visual search. Three experiments using Chinese or Indonesian faces as other-race faces yielded the opposite pattern of results: faster detection of same-race faces among other-race faces. This apparently inconsistent pattern of results was resolved by showing that Asian and African American faces are detected preferentially in tasks that have small stimulus sets and employ fixed target searches. Asian and African American other-race faces are found slower among Caucasian face backgrounds if larger stimulus sets are used in tasks with a variable mapping of stimulus to background or target. Thus, preferential detection of other-race faces was not found under task conditions in which preferential detection of animal and social fear-relevant stimuli is evident. Although consistent with the view that same-race faces are processed in more detail than other-race faces, the current findings suggest that other-race faces do not draw attention preferentially.
Keyword other-race effect
visual search
fear relevance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 08:02:37 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology