The 'third class' of medications: Sales and purchasing behavior are associated with Pharmacist Only and Pharmacy Medicine classifications in Australia

Emmerton, Lynne (2009) The 'third class' of medications: Sales and purchasing behavior are associated with Pharmacist Only and Pharmacy Medicine classifications in Australia. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, 49 1: 31-37. doi:10.1331/JAPhA.2009.07117


Author Emmerton, Lynne
Title The 'third class' of medications: Sales and purchasing behavior are associated with Pharmacist Only and Pharmacy Medicine classifications in Australia
Journal name Journal of the American Pharmacists Association   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1544-3191
1544-3450
Publication date 2009-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1331/JAPhA.2009.07117
Volume 49
Issue 1
Start page 31
End page 37
Total pages 7
Place of publication Washington, D.C. U.S.A.
Publisher American Pharmacists Association
Language eng
Subject 1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Formatted abstract
Objective:
Nonprescription (over-the-counter) medications in Australia are classified as Pharmacist Only Medicines, Pharmacy Medicines, or unscheduled medications. This report characterizes these medication classifications using key sales and purchasing behavior variables.

Design:
Descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional study.

Setting:
15 pharmacies in southeast Queensland, Australia, with data recorded over 36 hours per pharmacy in mid-August, 2006.

Participants:
Eligible purchasers (n = 3,470 medication purchases) of all nonprescription medications (including nutritional supplements).

Intervention:
Researchers documented details of all observed nonprescription medication sales and interviewed all available patients following the transaction.

Main outcome measures:
Incidence of product-related consultation, products purchased (brand, dosage form, classification), and purchasing behavior data (including previous purchase, intended use, intended user, and intention to purchase a particular brand).

Results:
More restrictive classification of the purchased medication was significantly (P < 0.01) associated with younger purchasers, purchase of a single nonprescription medication, intent to self-use the medication, intent to purchase a particular brand, repeat purchase, brand-switching interventions by pharmacy staff, pharmacy staff influence on first-time purchases, and observed consultation by pharmacists. Legislative compliance issues were identified: Pharmacists consulted in only 54.7% of Pharmacist Only Medicine sales and 13 cases (1.7% of observed sales) occurred in which Pharmacist Only and Pharmacy Medicines had been sourced from publicly accessible areas of the store.

Conclusion:
Pharmacist Only Medicines received greater levels of professional involvement during their sale than Pharmacy Medicines and unscheduled medications, despite higher levels of product familiarity among patients. To optimize the benefits of this classification system, emphasis on professional guidelines is recommended.
Keyword OTC products
nonprescription medications
pharmacist-only class of drugs
behavior
surveys
pharmacy-access drug products
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Pharmacy Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 08:01:50 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences