Thresholds and multiple scale interaction of environment, resource use, and market proximity on reef fishery resources in the Solomon Islands

Brewer, TD, Cinner, JE, Green, A and Pandolfi, John M (2009) Thresholds and multiple scale interaction of environment, resource use, and market proximity on reef fishery resources in the Solomon Islands. BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION, 142 8: 1797-1807. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2009.03.021


Author Brewer, TD
Cinner, JE
Green, A
Pandolfi, John M
Title Thresholds and multiple scale interaction of environment, resource use, and market proximity on reef fishery resources in the Solomon Islands
Journal name BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3207
Publication date 2009-08
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2009.03.021
Volume 142
Issue 8
Start page 1797
End page 1807
Total pages 11
Editor Primack, R B
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
960506 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Fresh, Ground and Surface Water Environments
Abstract Reef fish are critical in maintaining the ecological function of coral reefs and providing food security for coastal communities in developing countries. Reef fishery stocks are under increasing threat from factors such as climate-related habitat degradation, land use practices, and resource extraction related to human population growth, direct consumption and increasing connectivity between the in situ fishery and fish markets. This study investigates how reef fish stocks are related to environmental, localised resource use and market proximity indicators across 51 sites in the Solomon Islands. Hard coral cover is the best indicator of total target fishery biomass, with cover of less than around 31% associated with significantly less biomass than sites with higher coral cover. Direct resource use indicators such as fish consumption and fish sale pressure were poor predictors of target fish biomass. Distance of the fishery resource from community, provincial sub-station, provincial capital and national capital are all significantly and positively correlated with biomass for four key fishery families: Acanthuridae (surgeonfish), Scaridae (parrotfish), Lethrinidae (emperor), Lutjanidae (snapper). Multiple spatial scale relationships are evident between market proximity indicators and Lutjanidae and Scaridae families. Thus, while pooled target fishery biomass is constrained by environment, analysis at fishery family resolution reveals the effects of anthropogenic impact through market proximity on constraining fishery biomass distribution in the Solomon Islands. This study highlights the need for reef fishery managers and conservation practitioners to focus attention on proximity of resources to markets to sustain the ecological health of reef dominated ecosystems. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Biomass midpoint
PAPUA-NEW-GUINEA
Regression tree
Human population
Spatial threat
coral-reefs
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Ecology Centre Publications
Centre for Marine Studies Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 07:54:37 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Centre for Marine Studies