The physical and mental health of Australian Vietnam veterans 3 decades after the war and its relation to military service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder

O'Toole, Brian I., Catts, Stanley V., Outram, Sue, Pierse, Katherine R. and Cockburn, Jill (2009) The physical and mental health of Australian Vietnam veterans 3 decades after the war and its relation to military service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Americal Journal of Epidemiology, 170 3: 318-330. doi:10.1093/aje/kwp146


Author O'Toole, Brian I.
Catts, Stanley V.
Outram, Sue
Pierse, Katherine R.
Cockburn, Jill
Title The physical and mental health of Australian Vietnam veterans 3 decades after the war and its relation to military service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder
Journal name Americal Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9262
Publication date 2009-08
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwp146
Volume 170
Issue 3
Start page 318
End page 330
Total pages 13
Editor Moyses Szklo
Place of publication United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
111706 Epidemiology
110319 Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy)
920204 Evaluation of Health Outcomes
920410 Mental Health
Formatted abstract
The long-term health consequences of war service remain unclear, despite burgeoning scientific interest. A longitudinal cohort study of a random sample of Australian Vietnam veterans was designed to assess veterans’ postwar physical and mental health 36 years after the war (2005–2006) and to examine its relation to Army service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) assessed 14 years previously (1990–1993). Prevalences in veterans (n = 450) were compared with those in the Australian general population. Veterans’ Army service and data from the first assessments were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression prediction modeling. Veterans’ general health and some health risk factors were poorer and medical consultation rates were higher than Australian population expectations. Of 67 long-term conditions, the prevalences of 47 were higher and the prevalences of 4 were lower when compared with population expectations. Half of all veterans took some form of medication for mental well-being. The prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses exceeded Australian population expectations. Military and war service characteristics and age were the most frequent predictors of physical health endpoints, while PTSD was most strongly associated with psychiatric diagnoses. Draftees had better physical health than regular enlistees but no better mental health. Army service and war-related PTSD are associated with risk of illness in later life among Australian Vietnam veterans.
Keyword combat disorders
health status
psychiatry
psychiatry
stress disorders
post-traumatic
veterans
Vietnam
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 40 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 07:46:40 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Psychiatry - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital