Vector competence of Australian Culex gelidus Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae) for endemic and exotic arboviruses

Johnson, Petrina H, Hall-Mendelin, Sonja, Whelan, Peter I., Frances, Stephen P., Jansen, Cassie C., Mackenzie, Donna O., Northill, Judith A. and van den Hurk, Andrew F. (2009) Vector competence of Australian Culex gelidus Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae) for endemic and exotic arboviruses. Australian Journal of Entomology, 48 3: 234-240. doi:10.1111/j.1440-6055.2009.00711.x


Author Johnson, Petrina H
Hall-Mendelin, Sonja
Whelan, Peter I.
Frances, Stephen P.
Jansen, Cassie C.
Mackenzie, Donna O.
Northill, Judith A.
van den Hurk, Andrew F.
Title Vector competence of Australian Culex gelidus Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae) for endemic and exotic arboviruses
Formatted title
Vector competence of Australian Culex gelidus Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae) for endemic and exotic arboviruses
Journal name Australian Journal of Entomology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-6756
1440-6055
Publication date 2009-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-6055.2009.00711.x
Volume 48
Issue 3
Start page 234
End page 240
Total pages 7
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
060506 Virology
920109 Infectious Diseases
Formatted abstract
The recent recognition of established populations of the mosquito, Culex gelidus Theobald, in Australia has raised concerns about local transmission of arboviruses. The vector competence of a mainland population of Cx. gelidus was investigated for two local alphaviruses, Ross River (RRV) and Barmah Forest (BFV) viruses, and three flaviviruses, Japanese encephalitis (JEV), Kunjin (KUNV) and Murray Valley encephalitis (MVEV) viruses. Colonised mosquitoes were exposed to virus via blood-soaked pledgets and transmission was tested using a capillary-tube method. The important Australian vectors, Aedes vigilax (Skuse) and Culex annulirostris Skuse, were used as internal controls for the alphaviruses and flaviviruses, respectively. Overall, Cx. gelidus was a more efficient vector of flaviviruses than alphaviruses. Culex gelidus was refractory to infection with BFV, and nearly 25% transmitted RRV, which was comparable to Ae. vigilax. Culex gelidus was susceptible to all three flaviviruses, with transmission rates of 96%, 95% and 41% for JEV, KUNV and MVEV, respectively. JEV transmission rates in Cx. annulirostris were unexpectedly low and this was possibly due to differences in susceptibility to JEV genotypes I and II. Considering the high susceptibility to the flaviviruses demonstrated here, and the natural infections with RRV and JEV that have been detected from northern Australian populations, the establishment of the exotic mosquito, Cx. gelidus, in Australia is potentially a significant public health concern.
Keyword Australia
Culex gelidus
Japanese encephalitis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 07:44:37 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences