The Stress-Buffering Effects of Control on Task Satisfaction and Perceived Goal Attainment: An Experimental Study of the Moderating Influence of Desire for Control

Parker, SL, Jimmieson, NL and Amiot, CE (2009) The Stress-Buffering Effects of Control on Task Satisfaction and Perceived Goal Attainment: An Experimental Study of the Moderating Influence of Desire for Control. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 58 4: 622-652. doi:10.1111/j.1464-0597.2008.00367.x


Author Parker, SL
Jimmieson, NL
Amiot, CE
Title The Stress-Buffering Effects of Control on Task Satisfaction and Perceived Goal Attainment: An Experimental Study of the Moderating Influence of Desire for Control
Journal name Applied Psychology: An International Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-994X
Publication date 2009-10
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1464-0597.2008.00367.x
Volume 58
Issue 4
Start page 622
End page 652
Total pages 31
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract The purpose of the present study was to examine the extent to which Desire for Control (DFC) interacts with experimental manipulations of demand and control, and the consequences of these interactions on task satisfaction and perceived goal attainment (i.e. task performance and task mastery). It was expected that the proposed stress-buffering effects of control would be evident only for individuals high in DFC. Moreover, it was anticipated that control may have a stress-exacerbating effect for those low in DFC. These hypotheses were tested on a sample of 137 first year psychology students who participated in an in-basket activity under low and high conditions of demand and control. Results revealed that the proposed stress-buffering effect of control was found only for those high in DFC and a stress-exacerbating effect of increased control was evident for those low in DFC on task performance and task mastery perceptions. Future research directions and the implications of these findings to applied settings are discussed.
Keyword DEMAND-CONTROL MODEL
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 07:43:06 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology