Exploring information needs and information behaviour in oncology contexts: the importance of tasks, roles and organisational settings

Fourie, Ina and Bakker, Suzanne (2009). Exploring information needs and information behaviour in oncology contexts: the importance of tasks, roles and organisational settings. In: Positioning the Profession: the Tenth International Congress on Medical Librarianship, Brisbane, Australia, (1-15). August 31-September 4, 2009.

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Author Fourie, Ina
Bakker, Suzanne
Title of paper Exploring information needs and information behaviour in oncology contexts: the importance of tasks, roles and organisational settings
Conference name Positioning the Profession: the Tenth International Congress on Medical Librarianship
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates August 31-September 4, 2009
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1
End page 15
Formatted Abstract/Summary In healthcare contexts successful task fulfillment, teaching, professional development, and patient education may to a large extent depend on information. The increasing number of cancer patients world-wide, the life-threatening aspects of cancer, and the growing number of better informed patients mean that healthcare professionals in oncology are seemingly under increasing pressure to keep up-to-date with information. Studies conducted in The Netherlands and South Africa offer insight into the dynamics of information needs and information behaviour, which is important and relevant for both healthcare professionals and library and information (LIS) professionals serving in this context.

Oncology healthcare professionals (e.g. oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, social workers, physiotherapists) are influenced by their role and task, the care model accepted, organisational/institutional policy, and the healthcare policy in general. The results indicate that there are many different roles and tasks and that information needs and needs for library and information services (LIS) vary extensively between the different user groups and countries. Day-to-day patient care, using practice & clinical guidelines and treatment protocols, may seem to imply a lesser need for information than for healthcare professionals who is involved in training and education or in research. Perceptions on the responsibility to note the latest developments (e.g. between nurses and physicians or oncologists, but also between educators, team leaders and team members) will also be noted.
Subjects 0807 Library and Information Studies
Keyword Oncology
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Wed, 19 Aug 2009, 16:21:50 EST by Majella Pugh on behalf of The University of Queensland Library