Changing trends of medical school curriculum, effect of technology and role of libraries: a case study at the Caribbean medical schools

Pathan, Majid (2009). Changing trends of medical school curriculum, effect of technology and role of libraries: a case study at the Caribbean medical schools. In: Positioning the Profession: the Tenth International Congress on Medical Librarianship, Brisbane Australia, (1-21). August 31-September 4, 2009.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Thur_PathanPPT.pdf PowerPoint application/pdf 8.17MB 164
n4_5_Thurs_Pathan_17.pdf 4_5_Thurs_Pathan_17.pdf application/pdf 247.12KB 1511

Author Pathan, Majid
Title of paper Changing trends of medical school curriculum, effect of technology and role of libraries: a case study at the Caribbean medical schools
Conference name Positioning the Profession: the Tenth International Congress on Medical Librarianship
Conference location Brisbane Australia
Conference dates August 31-September 4, 2009
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1
End page 21
Abstract/Summary It is an era of ‘Gen Next’ and those seeking admission into a professional school are millennium students. The medical school curriculum in US and Caribbean is going through toughest reviews and scrutiny. It keeps on refocusing regularly. The technological advances that have influenced medical education have created demands for suitable shift in the curriculum of medical schools from traditional to incorporate several aspects like evidence-based medicine. The libraries are trying to keep up with changing trends in medical education to acquire all that is needed to support teaching, research, and healthcare. Off-shore medical schools, irrespective of what the LCME, the AMA and the AAMC consider of these, are crucial part of US medical system which largely depends on the graduates of these schools to fill the physician void by allowing them to enter the mainstream of American medical system. Since the establishment of the first medical school in one of the Caribbean states - Cuba in early part of the 18th century; and later at Montserrat in 1978, at Dominica in 1979, medical schools in other Caribbean islands are being established on a regular basis. Each medical school in the Caribbean region has adopted a typical curriculum that it feels will prepare students to be better qualified, knowledgeable, and skilled professionals. Most of schools in the Caribbean region do have a excellent library system offering traditional as well as state-of-the-art services - digital and web-based. However, there are a few among these that lack a sound library system to augment medical education and teaching. The author gives brief account of his experiences in the establishment of health sciences libraries at the two different medical school, which are now considered as the major schools in Caribbean region. This article narrates the efforts, challenges, and problems encountered while establishing and upgrading libraries to the acceptable International standards.
Subjects 0807 Library and Information Studies
330109 Assessment and Evaluation
1301 Education Systems
Keyword Caribbean Medical Schools
Libraries and international standards
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 253 Abstract Views, 1711 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 13 Aug 2009, 12:43:12 EST by Mrs Jennifer Hall on behalf of The University of Queensland Library