Medical and life science journal usage in veterinary medicine: identifying the complementary core

Youngen, Gregory K. (2009). Medical and life science journal usage in veterinary medicine: identifying the complementary core. In: Positioning the Profession: the Tenth International Congress on Medical Librarianship, Brisbane Australia, (1-9). August 31-September 4, 2009.

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Author Youngen, Gregory K.
Title of paper Medical and life science journal usage in veterinary medicine: identifying the complementary core
Conference name Positioning the Profession: the Tenth International Congress on Medical Librarianship
Conference location Brisbane Australia
Conference dates August 31-September 4, 2009
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1
End page 9
Abstract/Summary Research in veterinary medicine employs the literature of many complementary fields of study. The literature of biology, including anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, toxicology, as well as laboratory and clinical sciences are essential. Also, most aspects of human medicine overlap in varying degrees with veterinary medicine. This paper describes the resources and processes that individual collection managers can use to identify the non-veterinary journals of importance to veterinary researchers at their institutions. Additionally, the methodology employed in this study will be useful for libraries supporting other allied health fields where large medical research libraries or collections are absent. Ensuring access to the most relevant and up-to-date peer-reviewed journal literature is an essential function of the library. The services outlined in this paper make keeping up with the changing information usage and needs of a library’s users possible. Objective: Identify the primary non-veterinary journals used by researchers at a college of veterinary medicine. Methodology: Employing the analytical components of commercial and open-source bibliographic resources (Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed, et al) to measure local article authorship and usage. Result: A list of journals falling outside the core field of study - yet evidenced as essential - to the research needs of a specific user group. Conclusion: Identification of the “complementary core” can be elusive and will vary by institution, by the changing internal research priorities, and over time. This paper describes an ongoing process that can be employed when reviewing journal subscriptions to ensure the collection’s relevancy to the user base.
Subjects 0807 Library and Information Studies
0707 Veterinary Sciences
Keyword Bibliographic metrics
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Thu, 13 Aug 2009, 12:28:17 EST by Mrs Jennifer Hall on behalf of The University of Queensland Library