Creating research capacity in developing countries: the role of international collaborative networks of information professionals: a case study of ophthalmic resource centres in Asia and Africa

Sharma, Sudha Risal, Kirubanithi, P., Sieving, Pamela C., Anton, Bette and Howett, Catherine (2009). Creating research capacity in developing countries: the role of international collaborative networks of information professionals: a case study of ophthalmic resource centres in Asia and Africa. In: Positioning the Profession: the Tenth International Congress on Medical Librarianship, Brisbane, Australia, (1-19). August 31-September 4, 2009.

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Author Sharma, Sudha Risal
Kirubanithi, P.
Sieving, Pamela C.
Anton, Bette
Howett, Catherine
Title of paper Creating research capacity in developing countries: the role of international collaborative networks of information professionals: a case study of ophthalmic resource centres in Asia and Africa
Conference name Positioning the Profession: the Tenth International Congress on Medical Librarianship
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates August 31-September 4, 2009
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1
End page 19
Formatted Abstract/Summary The goal of building health care capacity in developing countries is dependent upon establishing clinical and research Communities of Practice (COP). There is a need for infrastructure, funding, high-level support, advocacy and a community vision. Particularly, to function in the knowledge economy, Communities of Practice require the capacity to generate, disseminate, absorb and respond to knowledge. Information literacy, research development programs and the availability of trained information professionals are key.

Case study:
VISION 2020: The Right to Sight is the global initiative for the elimination of avoidable blindness, coordinated jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB). Seva Foundation (USA) and Seva Canada, two partners in this initiative, support Centre for Community Ophthalmology in Asia and Africa. These Centres are designed to produce the clinical and management personnel, management systems, and community activities required for both sustainable hospital and outreach programs, as well as training programs.

Seva’s solution incorporates support for Resource Centres and a network of vision science librarians developing both traditional and digital library services, linked with their professional colleagues through the Association of Vision Science Librarians (AVSL).

Our paper focuses on documenting the successes and challenges of this loosely connected network of international research units with markedly differing ‘information ecologies’ : differing size, infrastructure a variety of personnel resources with different training potential, a myriad of language barriers and sometimes unstable political climates.
  
Summary:
Resource Centres supporting Centres for Community Ophthalmology and an international network of vision librarians focusing on professional outreach, operating in cooperation with an international campaign to eliminate preventable blindness by the year 2020, and with the support of not-for-profit agencies (including Seva Foundation, Seva Canada, and the Lavelle Fund for the Blind) and Canadian government granting agencies, are important partners in vision care, education and research, participating in building health care capacity in developing countries.
Subjects 0807 Library and Information Studies
Keyword The Right to Sight
Seva Foundation (USA)
Seva Canada
Association of Vision Science Librarians
Lavelle Fund for the Blind
International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness
World Health Organization
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Thu, 13 Aug 2009, 11:36:55 EST by Majella Pugh on behalf of The University of Queensland Library