Production of bio-hydrogen using a membrane anaerobic reactor: limitations due to diffusion

Zheng, Hang, O'Sullivan, Kathryn, Mereddy, Ram, Zeng, Raymond J., Duke, Mikel and Clarke, William (2009). Production of bio-hydrogen using a membrane anaerobic reactor: limitations due to diffusion. In: Proceedings of the Environmental Research Event 2009, Noosa, QLD. Environmental Research Event 2009, Noosa Heads, Queensland, (1-15). 10-13th May 2009.

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Author Zheng, Hang
O'Sullivan, Kathryn
Mereddy, Ram
Zeng, Raymond J.
Duke, Mikel
Clarke, William
Title of paper Production of bio-hydrogen using a membrane anaerobic reactor: limitations due to diffusion
Conference name Environmental Research Event 2009
Conference location Noosa Heads, Queensland
Conference dates 10-13th May 2009
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Environmental Research Event 2009, Noosa, QLD
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Hydrogen is a renewable pollution-free energy carrier, but its production is relying heavily on technologies such as coal gasification and steam reforming of non-renewable resources. Anaerobic digestion of organic wastes can produce hydrogen without renewable resources. In order to maximise the hydrogen yield during digestion, hydrogen must be removed at a substantial rate to avoid accumulation to hydrophobic level and methane production. In this work, silica, alumina and hydrophobic polymeric microfiltration membranes were shown to work under submerged condition to remove hydrogen to the premeate gas phase. The different membranes trialled operated by different mechanisms, ranging from molecular scale diffusion (silica and alumina) to the bulk flow (polymeric). The polymeric type was found to have the best hydrogen diffusion for the purpose of this work, while the alumina appeared to be completely blocked after 24 hours submerged in water. The hydrostable silica membrane was effective at also removing hydrogen, but the permeamce was too low to meet the production of cells. Further investigations of the applicability of the potential of membranes for this promising process are needed.
Subjects 0502 Environmental Science and Management
Keyword biohydrogen
anaerobic digestion
membrane
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: ERE: Environmental Research Event 2009
 
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Created: Thu, 06 Aug 2009, 15:12:28 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of Library Corporate Services