Biomimetic theory and building technology: use of Aboriginal and scientific knowledge of Spinifex grass

Memmott, Paul, Hyde, Richard and O'Rourke, Timothy (2009). Biomimetic theory and building technology: use of Aboriginal and scientific knowledge of Spinifex grass. In: Richard Hyde, Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Conference on the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association (ANZASca). 42nd Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA), Newcastle, NSW, Australia, (117-125). 26-28 November 2008.

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Author Memmott, Paul
Hyde, Richard
O'Rourke, Timothy
Title of paper Biomimetic theory and building technology: use of Aboriginal and scientific knowledge of Spinifex grass
Conference name 42nd Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA)
Conference location Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 26-28 November 2008
Convener School of Architecture and Built Environment University of Newcastle
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Conference on the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association (ANZASca)   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Architectural Science Review   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Sydney, Australia
Publisher Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, University of Sydney
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.3763/asre.2009.0014
ISSN 0003-8628
1758-9622
Editor Richard Hyde
Volume 52
Issue 2
Start page 117
End page 125
Total pages 9
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary There is currently much interest in designing new materials that mimic particular properties of plants. For example, self-cleaning materials have been developed from structures on the leaf surface of sacred lotus, and new composite fibres are being designed from plants to replace metal structures. Biomimetic theory and its application, bio-inspired design, derive concepts from natural systems and appear to have potential to create new types of sustainable materials. The benefits of this approach seem to come from the linking of ethnographic and ecological research with building science to create and test new building technologies. Using spinifex as an example, it has been possible to develop some underlying principles to this approach to advance the methodology.
© 2009 Earthscan Ltd.
Subjects 879899 Environmentally Sustainable Construction not elsewhere classified
050201 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Knowledge
1201 Architecture
1202 Building
Keyword Materials and construction
Sustainable design
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 13 Jul 2009, 12:26:01 EST by Deirdre Timo on behalf of Faculty Of Engineering, Architecture & Info Tech