Superimposed vibration confers no additional benefit compared to resistance training alone

Riek, S., Popple, A., Verscheuren, S. and Carson, R. (2008). Superimposed vibration confers no additional benefit compared to resistance training alone. In: J. Cook, Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Proceedings of: asics Conference of science and medicine in sport 2008. 2008 Asics Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Hamilton Island, QLD, Australia, (S75-S76). 16-18 October 2008. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2008.12.181


Author Riek, S.
Popple, A.
Verscheuren, S.
Carson, R.
Title of paper Superimposed vibration confers no additional benefit compared to resistance training alone
Formatted title

Conference name 2008 Asics Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport
Conference location Hamilton Island, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 16-18 October 2008
Proceedings title Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Proceedings of: asics Conference of science and medicine in sport 2008   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier Australia
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2008.12.181
Open Access Status
ISSN 1440-2440
1878-1861
Editor J. Cook
Volume 12
Issue Suppl. 1
Start page S75
End page S76
Total pages 2
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Eighteen (10 males and 8 females) healthy sedentary participants were allocated at random to one of two groups: resistance training combined with vibration exercise (VIB) or resistance training alone (CON). Each individual trained three sessions per week for 4 weeks. Training consisted of three sets often seated calf-raises performed against an external load, which was increased progressively from 75% of each individual’s initial one repetition maximum (1RM) (week 1) to 90% 1RM (week 4). The amount of work performed during training was controlled by pacing the movements at a fixed frequency (0.3 Hz), and by providing visual feedback of limb position and range of motion. For the VIB group, a vibratory stimulus (30 Hz, 2.5mm amplitude) was applied via the soles of the feet by a commercially available vibration-training device during training. Following the intervention, there was no significant difference in the total amount of work performed during training. For both the VIB and CON groups there was a significant increase in maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and 1RM (both p < 0.01) with training. There were no reliable changes in measures that assessed the rate at which force was developed. Counter movement jump (CMJ) height increased for the CON (p < 0.01) but not for the VIB group. Comparisons between the groups revealed that they did not differ reliably from one another with respect to any measure of performance, prior to or following training. It appears therefore that superimposed vibration did not alter or augment the increase in strength induced by resistance training.
Subjects EX
110602 Exercise Physiology
110603 Motor Control
970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Additional Notes Published as no.180 under "Invited".

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 21 Jun 2009, 19:04:05 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences