Walking experiences in an Australian university community: Qualitative perspectives within a randomised controlled trial

Ferney, S., Gilson, N., Brown, W., Burton, N. and McKenna, J. (2008). Walking experiences in an Australian university community: Qualitative perspectives within a randomised controlled trial. In: J. Cook, Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport: ASICS Conference of science and medicine in sport 2008. 2008 ASICS Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Hamilton Island, QLD, Australia, (S78-S79). 16-18 October, 2008. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2008.12.189


Author Ferney, S.
Gilson, N.
Brown, W.
Burton, N.
McKenna, J.
Title of paper Walking experiences in an Australian university community: Qualitative perspectives within a randomised controlled trial
Formatted title

Conference name 2008 ASICS Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport
Conference location Hamilton Island, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 16-18 October, 2008
Proceedings title Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport: ASICS Conference of science and medicine in sport 2008   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2008.12.189
Open Access Status
ISSN 1440-2440
Editor J. Cook
Volume 12
Issue Suppl. 1
Start page S78
End page S79
Total pages 2
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Introduction:
This study explored the experiences of employees at an Australian university, recruited to a 10-week randomised controlled trial (n = 70). The trial compared “walking routes” or “walking-while-working” to a non-treatment control in terms of increases in daily step counts.

Methods:

A sub-sample of three academic and administrative employees from each intervention arm (five women; age 38.2 ± 2.5 years; increase of 600 ± 35 daily steps) completed interviews following the study. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and subject to inductive coding by two researchers.

Results and discussion:

Pedometers were highlighted as a valuable motivational tool for increasing workplace walking and for generating awareness of sedentary behaviours. Participants in both intervention groups reported improved perceptions of health and productivity, with increased walking during work hours linked to stress reduction and enhanced output. Participants highlighted challenges specific to each intervention type. “Walking routes” was difficult for participants to achieve due to busy schedules and physical barriers (i.e., hot and humid climate). “Walking-while-working” seemed to circumvent these difficulties by integrating steps into workday practices. However, concerns over ‘desk absence’ – even though this time was spent productively – impacted on the willingness of employees to adopt an incidental walking approach.

Conclusions:

Findings identify the positive impact that walking while at work can have on employees’ perceptions of health and productivity. The need to address acceptable office-based practice withstanding, they also highlight the adjunct value of strategies that encourage incidental workplace walking.
Subjects EX
920205 Health Education and Promotion
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
111712 Health Promotion
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

 
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Created: Sun, 21 Jun 2009, 18:43:58 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences